See also: Salvo, salvó, and salvò

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin salvo, ablative of salvus, the past participle of salvāre (to save, to reserve), either from salvo jure (the right being reserved), or from salvo errore et omissone (reserving error and omission).

NounEdit

salvo (plural salvos or salvoes)

  1. An exception; a reservation; an excuse.
Derived termsEdit
  • A salvo clause in legal documents or audit reports details reservations or limitations.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A 1719 alteration of salva (simultaneous discharge of guns) (1591) from Latin salva (salute, volley) (compare French salve, also from Italian), from Latin salve (hail), the usual Roman greeting, imperative of salvere (to be in good health).

NounEdit

salvo (plural salvos or salvoes)

  1. (military) A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
  2. A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.
  3. (by extension) Any volley, as in an argument or debate.
    • 2011 October 1, Phil Dawkes, “Sunderland 2 - 2 West Brom”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      It was an impressive opening salvo from the Baggies, especially for a side that have made a poor beginning to what has been an admittedly tough start to their campaign.
    • 2019 October 6, Tim Shipman and Caroline Wheeler, “'Sack me if you dare,' Johnson will tell Queen”, in The Sunday Times, number 10,178, page 1:
      Together, Johnson's plans mean that the clashes in parliament and the Supreme Court may be only the opening salvos in what promises to be the biggest constitutional storm in centuries.
  4. The combined cheers of a crowd.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

salvo (third-person singular simple present salvos, present participle salvoing, simple past and past participle salvoed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To discharge weapons in a salvo.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

VerbEdit

salvo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of salvar

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French salve, from Italian salva, from Latin salvē (greeting).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɑl.voː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sal‧vo

NounEdit

salvo n (plural salvo's, diminutive salvootje n)

  1. salvo, volley, a series of shots

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: salvo

GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

salvo m (feminine singular salva, masculine plural salvos, feminine plural salvas)

  1. safe

Derived termsEdit

PrepositionEdit

salvo

  1. except
    Synonym: agás

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

salvo (plural salvi)

  1. rescue
    Synonym: salvado
  2. salvation
    Synonym: salveso

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin salvus.[1] Cognate to French sauf.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsal.vo/
  • Rhymes: -alvo
  • Hyphenation: sàl‧vo

AdjectiveEdit

salvo (feminine salva, masculine plural salvi, feminine plural salve)

  1. safe, out of danger, saved, secure from
    Synonyms: salvato, fuori pericolo, al sicuro da
  2. safe, whole, intact, undamaged
    Synonyms: intatto, indenne, non danneggiato

PrepositionEdit

salvo

  1. except, but, save
    Synonyms: eccetto, tranne, eccetto, ad eccezione di, fatto salvo

ConjunctionEdit

salvo che

  1. except that; save that, unless, if... not
    Synonym: a meno che non

VerbEdit

salvo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of salvare

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Angelo Prati, "Vocabolario Etimologico Italiano", Torino, 1951

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From salvus (safe).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

salvō (present infinitive salvāre, perfect active salvāvī, supine salvātum); first conjugation

  1. (Late Latin) I save (make safe or healthy)
    • a. 430, Augustinus, Sermo XVII
      Non enim amat Deus damnare sed salvare.
      For God loves not to condemn but to save.

Usage notesEdit

This term is not found in Classical Latin, which uses servo instead.

ConjugationEdit

   Conjugation of salvō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present salvō salvās salvat salvāmus salvātis salvant
imperfect salvābam salvābās salvābat salvābāmus salvābātis salvābant
future salvābō salvābis salvābit salvābimus salvābitis salvābunt
perfect salvāvī salvāvistī salvāvit salvāvimus salvāvistis salvāvērunt, salvāvēre
pluperfect salvāveram salvāverās salvāverat salvāverāmus salvāverātis salvāverant
future perfect salvāverō salvāveris salvāverit salvāverimus salvāveritis salvāverint
passive present salvor salvāris, salvāre salvātur salvāmur salvāminī salvantur
imperfect salvābar salvābāris, salvābāre salvābātur salvābāmur salvābāminī salvābantur
future salvābor salvāberis, salvābere salvābitur salvābimur salvābiminī salvābuntur
perfect salvātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect salvātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect salvātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present salvem salvēs salvet salvēmus salvētis salvent
imperfect salvārem salvārēs salvāret salvārēmus salvārētis salvārent
perfect salvāverim salvāverīs salvāverit salvāverīmus salvāverītis salvāverint
pluperfect salvāvissem salvāvissēs salvāvisset salvāvissēmus salvāvissētis salvāvissent
passive present salver salvēris, salvēre salvētur salvēmur salvēminī salventur
imperfect salvārer salvārēris, salvārēre salvārētur salvārēmur salvārēminī salvārentur
perfect salvātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect salvātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present salvā salvāte
future salvātō salvātō salvātōte salvantō
passive present salvāre salvāminī
future salvātor salvātor salvantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives salvāre salvāvisse salvātūrum esse salvārī salvātum esse salvātum īrī
participles salvāns salvātūrus salvātus salvandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
salvandī salvandō salvandum salvandō salvātum salvātū

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1998), “salvo”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Cologne: Brill, →ISBN, page 412
  • salvo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • salvo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • salvo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • without violating, neglecting one's duty: salvo officio (Off. 3. 1. 4)
    • to greet a person: aliquem salvere iubere (Att. 4. 14)
  • save in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈsaw.vu/, [ˈsaʊ̯.vu]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈsal.vu/, [ˈsaɫ.vu]

AdjectiveEdit

salvo m (feminine singular salva, masculine plural salvos, feminine plural salvas, comparable)

  1. safe

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

salvo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of salvar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin salvus. Cognate with English safe.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsalbo/, [ˈsal.β̞o]
  • Hyphenation: sal‧vo

AdjectiveEdit

salvo (feminine salva, masculine plural salvos, feminine plural salvas)

  1. safe

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

salvo

  1. except, apart from

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

salvo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of salvar.

Further readingEdit