situate

See also: sítuate

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin situātus, past participle of Medieval Latin situō (to locate, place), from Latin situs (a site).

PronunciationEdit

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ˈsɪt͡ʃ.u.eɪt/, /ˈsɪt.ju.eɪt/
    • (file)
  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ˈsɪt͡ʃ.u.ət/, /ˈsɪt.ju.ət/
    • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sit‧u‧ate

VerbEdit

situate (third-person singular simple present situates, present participle situating, simple past and past participle situated)

  1. (transitive) To place on or into a physical location.
    The statue is situated in a corner hardly visible to the public, except through a window from an outside maintenance area situated behind the building.
  2. (transitive) To place or put into an intangible place or position, such as social, ethical, fictional, etc. Most commonly used adjectivally in past participle and often used figuratively.
    The mayor is situated between probable censure and possible recall.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “Setting the Record Straight: An In-depth Examination of Hobson-Jobson”, in International Journal of Lexicography, volume 31, number 4, DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ijl/ecy010, page 487:
      Other critiques have not focussed on the lexicography but rather have situated Hobson-Jobson within a larger postcolonialist critique of the British imperial project.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

situate (comparative more situate, superlative most situate)

  1. (now rare) Situated.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970:
      , II.ii.3:
      Wadley in Berkshire is situate in a vale, though not so fertile a soil as some vales afford […].
    • 1667, John Milton, “(please specify the book number)”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      Pleasure situate in hill and dale.
    • 1938, letter from South African Secretary for Native Affairs to N L Henwood[1]:
      [] the farm Kafferskraal No. 62 is not situate within a released area and its acquisition by the South African Native Trust is consequently not contemplated.
  2. (heraldry) Situated; located.
    • 2013, Arthur Charles Fox-Davies, A Complete Guide To Heraldry, →ISBN:
      The arms of the College of Surgeons in Endinburgh, I fancy, afford the only instance of what is presumably a corpse, the blazon being: "Azure, a man (human body) fesswise between a dexter hand having an eye on the palm issuing out of a cloud downward and a castle situate on a rock proper, within a bordure or charged with several instruments peculiar to the art (sic); on a canton of the first a saltire argent surmounted of a thistle vert, crowned of the third."

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

situate

  1. feminine plural of situato

ParticipleEdit

situate f pl

  1. feminine plural of situato

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

situate

  1. inflection of situare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

situāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of situō