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See also: Situs

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin situs (position, site)

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

situs (plural situses)

  1. The position, especially the usual, normal position, of a body part or part of a plant.
  2. The method in which the parts of a plant are arranged.
  3. (law) The location of a property as used for taxation or other legal purposes.
  4. (real estate) The street number and street name of an address such as "3912 Park Drive". It does not include the city, county, country, etc.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Perfect passive participle of sinō (put, lay, set down; usually let, suffer, permit).

ParticipleEdit

situs (feminine sita, neuter situm); first/second-declension participle

  1. permitted, allowed, suffered, having been permitted
  2. put, laid or set down, having been set down
  3. (by extension) placed, set, lying, situated, positioned
  4. (by extension, of the dead) lying, laid, buried, interred
  5. (by extension) built, founded
  6. (figuratively) placed, situated, present, ready
  7. (figuratively) dependent upon
DeclensionEdit

First/second-declension adjective.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative situs sita situm sitī sitae sita
Genitive sitī sitae sitī sitōrum sitārum sitōrum
Dative sitō sitō sitīs
Accusative situm sitam situm sitōs sitās sita
Ablative sitō sitā sitō sitīs
Vocative site sita situm sitī sitae sita
Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

situs m (genitive sitūs); fourth declension

  1. The manner of lying; the situation, position or site of something.
  2. A quarter of the world, region.
  3. (Late Latin) description
DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative situs sitūs
Genitive sitūs situum
Dative situī sitibus
Accusative situm sitūs
Ablative sitū sitibus
Vocative situs sitūs
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

According to de Vaan, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰi-téw-s, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰey- (to decline, perish).[1]

NounEdit

situs m (genitive sitūs); fourth declension

  1. Rust, mould, mustiness, dust, dirt; soil.
  2. Filthiness of the body.
  3. (figuratively) Neglect, idleness, absence of use.
  4. (figuratively, of the mind) A rusting, moulding or wasting away, dullness, inactivity.
DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative situs sitūs
Genitive sitūs situum
Dative situī sitibus
Accusative situm sitūs
Ablative sitū sitibus
Vocative situs sitūs
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “situs”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 568
  • situs in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • situs in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • situs in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • situs in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the situation of a place: situs loci
    • to be favourably situated: opportuno loco situm or positum esse
    • the city is very beautifully situated: urbs situ ad aspectum praeclara est
    • the city is situate on a bay: urbs in sinu sita est
    • here lies..: hic situs est...
    • to depend upon a thing: positum, situm esse in aliqua re
    • to be in a person's power: in manu, in potestate alicuius situm, positum esse
    • to give a brief exposition of the geography of Africa: Africae situm paucis exponere
    • (ambiguous) to suffer agonies of thirst: siti cruciari, premi
  • situs in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • site in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.