sombre

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French, from Latin sub- + umbra.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

sombre (comparative sombrer, superlative sombrest)

  1. Dark; gloomy.
  2. Dull or dark in colour.
  3. Melancholy; dismal.
    • Beaconsfield
      The dinner was silent and sombre; happily it was also short.
  4. Grave.
    a sombre situation

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

sombre (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) gloom; obscurity; duskiness

VerbEdit

sombre (third-person singular simple present sombres, present participle sombring, simple past and past participle sombred)

  1. To make sombre or dark; to make shady.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sub + umbra.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sombre (masculine and feminine, plural sombres)

  1. dark

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

VerbEdit

sombre

  1. first-, third-person singular indicative present of sombrer
  2. first-, third-person singular subjunctive present of sombrer
  3. second-person singular imperative of sombrer

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sub (under) + umbra (shadow).

AdjectiveEdit

sombre (epicene, plural sombres)

  1. sombre, dark
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 23:18