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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin umbra (shadow). Doublet of umber.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

umbra (plural umbras or umbrae)

  1. The fully shaded inner region of a shadow cast by an opaque object.
    1. (astronomy) The area on the earth or moon experiencing the total phase of an eclipse.
  2. (astronomy) The central region of a sunspot.
  3. (chiefly literary) A shadow.
  4. (archaic) An uninvited guest brought along by one who was invited.
  5. One of the family Umbridae of mudminnows.
  6. A sciaenoid fish, the umbrine.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin umbra (shadow).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔmbra/, [ˈɔmb̥ʁɑ]

NounEdit

umbra c (singular definite umbraen, not used in plural form)

  1. umber (pigment, colour)
  2. (as an adjective) umber (of a reddish brown colour)

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈumbrɑ/, [ˈumbrɑ]
  • Hyphenation: umb‧ra

NounEdit

umbra

  1. umbra

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of umbra (Kotus type 10/koira, no gradation)
nominative umbra umbrat
genitive umbran umbrien
partitive umbraa umbria
illative umbraan umbriin
singular plural
nominative umbra umbrat
accusative nom. umbra umbrat
gen. umbran
genitive umbran umbrien
umbrainrare
partitive umbraa umbria
inessive umbrassa umbrissa
elative umbrasta umbrista
illative umbraan umbriin
adessive umbralla umbrilla
ablative umbralta umbrilta
allative umbralle umbrille
essive umbrana umbrina
translative umbraksi umbriksi
instructive umbrin
abessive umbratta umbritta
comitative umbrineen

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin.

NounEdit

umbra (plural umbras)

  1. shadow

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

umbra

  1. feminine singular of umbro

NounEdit

umbra f (plural umbre, masculine umbro)

  1. Female Umbrian; woman native or inhabitant of Umbria

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

If from Old Latin *omra, possibly from a Proto-Indo-European *h₂mr-u-, *h₂mrup-; related to Ancient Greek ἀμαυρός (amaurós, dark), Luwian 𒈠𒅈𒉿𒄿𒀀 (rot), and 𒈠𒊒𒉿𒄿 (rotten) (also see Hittite Maraššantiya, their name for the Kızılırmak River), and this IE source said to be a possible borrowing from a Semitic root h-m-r (be red).[1]

Generally connected with Lithuanian unksna.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

umbra f (genitive umbrae); first declension

  1. a shadow
  2. a shade
  3. a ghost

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative umbra umbrae
Genitive umbrae umbrārum
Dative umbrae umbrīs
Accusative umbram umbrās
Ablative umbrā umbrīs
Vocative umbra umbrae

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • umbra in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • umbra in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • umbra in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to exert oneself in the schools: desudare in scholae umbra or umbraculis
  • umbra in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill
  1. ^ Whitehead, The Sound of Indo-European: Phonetics, Phonemics, and Morphophonemics, p. 13
  2. ^ de Vaan, Michiel, Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages, vol. 7, of Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series, Alexander Lubotsky ed., Leiden: Brill, 2008.

RomanianEdit

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

umbra f

  1. feminine singular of umbro

NounEdit

umbra f (plural umbras, masculine umbro, masculine plural umbros)

  1. female equivalent of umbro