See also: Grave, gravé, gravë, and -grave

English

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 grave on Wikipedia

Pronunciation

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  • enPR: grāv, IPA(key): /ɡɹeɪv/
    • Audio (US):(file)
    • Rhymes: -eɪv
  • (accent, also): IPA(key): /ɡɹɑːv/

Etymology 1

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From Middle English grave, grafe, from Old English græf, grafu (cave, grave, trench), from Proto-West Germanic *grab, from Proto-Germanic *grabą, *grabō (grave, trench, ditch), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape). Cognate with West Frisian grêf (grave), Dutch graf (grave), Low German Graf (a grave), Graff, German Grab (grave), Danish, Swedish and Norwegian grav (grave), Icelandic gröf (grave). Related to groove.

Noun

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A freshly dug grave

grave (countable and uncountable, plural graves)

  1. (strictly) An excavation in the earth as a place of burial.
    Synonym: plot
  2. (broadly) Any place of interment; a tomb; a sepulcher.
  3. (very broadly) Any place containing one or more corpses.
  4. (uncountable, by extension) Death, destruction.
  5. (by extension, uncountable) Deceased people; the dead.
    • 1925 July – 1926 May, A[rthur] Conan Doyle, “(please specify the chapter number)”, in The Land of Mist (eBook no. 0601351h.html), Australia: Project Gutenberg Australia, published April 2019:
      "Hold your jaw, woman! I've had enough to vex me to-day without you startin' your tantrums. You're jealous of the grave. That's wot's the matter with you." "And her brats can insult me as they like - me that 'as cared for you these five years."
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Sranan Tongo: grebi
Translations
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See also
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Etymology 2

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From Middle English graven, from Old English grafan (to dig, dig up, grave, engrave, carve, chisel), from Proto-Germanic *grabaną (to dig), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape). Cognate with Dutch graven (to dig), German graben (to dig), Danish grave (to dig), Swedish gräva (to dig), Icelandic grafa (to dig).

Verb

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grave (third-person singular simple present graves, present participle graving, simple past graved, past participle graved or graven)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To dig.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To carve or cut, as letters or figures, on some hard substance; to engrave.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To carve out or give shape to, by cutting with a chisel; to sculpture.
    to grave an image
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To impress deeply (on the mind); to fix indelibly.
    • 1718, Mat[thew] Prior, “Solomon on the Vanity of the World. A Poem in Three Books.”, in Poems on Several Occasions, London: [] Jacob Tonson [], and John Barber [], →OCLC, (please specify the page):
      O! may they graven in thy heart remain.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To entomb; to bury.
  6. (intransitive, obsolete) To write or delineate on hard substances, by means of incised lines; to practice engraving.
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Translations
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Etymology 3

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From Middle French grave, a learned borrowing from Latin gravis (heavy, important). Compare Old French greve (terrible, dreadful). Doublet of grief.

Adjective

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grave (comparative graver, superlative gravest)

  1. Characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness; not cheerful. [from 16th c.]
    Synonyms: sober, solemn, sombre, sedate, serious, staid
  2. Low in pitch, tone etc. [from 17th c.]
    Antonym: acute
    • 1854, John Weeks Moore, Encyclopedia of Music:
      The thicker the cord or string, the more grave is the note or tone.
  3. Serious, in a negative sense; important, formidable. [from 19th c.]
    Synonyms: serious, momentous, important
    • 2016 February 6, James Zogby, “Israel’s prickliness blocks the long quest for peace”, in The National[3]:
      Israel’s behaviour is doing grave damage to the Palestinian people and to any hope for peace.
    • 2017, Vladimir Shlapentokh, A Normal Totalitarian Society, page 80:
      Khrushchev made a grave miscalculation when he failed to appreciate the growing opposition to his power and overestimated the support of his bureaucracy.
  4. (phonology, dated, of a sound) Dull, produced in the middle or back of the mouth. (See   Grave and acute on Wikipedia.Wikipedia )
    Coordinate term: acute
  5. (obsolete) Influential, important; authoritative. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition II, section 3, member 7:
      An illiterate fool sits in a mans seat; and the common people hold him learned, grave, and wise.
Synonyms
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The terms below need to be checked and allocated to the definitions (senses) of the headword above. Each term should appear in the sense for which it is appropriate. For synonyms and antonyms you may use the templates {{syn|en|...}} or {{ant|en|...}}.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Noun

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grave (plural graves)

  1. A grave accent.
Translations
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Etymology 4

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Inherited from Middle English greyve. Doublet of graaf (borrowed from the Dutch cognate graaf (count, earl)) and graf (borrowed from the German cognate Graf (count, earl)).

Noun

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grave (plural graves)

  1. (historical) A count, prefect, or person holding office.
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Etymology 5

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Verb

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grave (third-person singular simple present graves, present participle graving, simple past and past participle graved)

  1. (transitive, obsolete, nautical) To clean, as a vessel's bottom, of barnacles, grass, etc., and pay it over with pitch — so called because graves or greaves was formerly used for this purpose.
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Anagrams

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Danish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ɡraːvə/, [ˈɡ̊ʁɑːvə]

Etymology 1

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From Italian grave, from Latin gravis (heavy, grave).

Adverb

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grave

  1. (music) grave (low in pitch, tone etc.)
  2. accent graveaccent grave, grave accent

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse grafa (to dig, bury), from Proto-Germanic *grabaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape).

Verb

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grave (imperative grav, infinitive at grave, present tense graver, past tense gravede, perfect tense har gravet)

  1. dig (to move hard-packed earth out of the way)
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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See grav (grave, tomb, pit).

Noun

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grave c

  1. indefinite plural of grav

Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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grave

  1. (dated or formal) singular present subjunctive of graven

Anagrams

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Esperanto

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Adverb

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grave

  1. seriously, gravely

French

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Middle French grave, borrowed from Latin gravis. Doublet of grief.

Adjective

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grave (plural graves)

  1. serious
  2. solemn
  3. low-pitched
    Antonym: aigu
  4. (phonetics) back
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Norwegian Bokmål: grave

Adverb

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grave

  1. (informal, slang) much; a lot
    Je te kiffe grave !
    I love you like crazy!

Etymology 2

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Verb

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grave

  1. inflection of graver:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Italian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin gravis. Doublet of greve.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡra.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ave
  • Hyphenation: grà‧ve

Adjective

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grave (plural gravi, superlative gravissimo)

  1. grave, serious
    un grave problema
    a serious problem
  2. heavy
  3. solemn
  4. (music) low-pitched, low-pitch

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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Descendants

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Anagrams

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Latin

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Adjective

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grave

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of gravis

References

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  • "grave", in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • grave in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • "grave", in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[4]

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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From the dative of Old English græf, from Proto-West Germanic *grab, from Proto-Germanic *grabą.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡraːv(ə)/, /ˈɡrav(ə)/, /ˈɡraf/

Noun

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grave (plural graves)

  1. grave, burial
  2. tomb, mausoleum
Derived terms
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Descendants
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References
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡraːvɛi̯/, /ˈɡraːveː/

Noun

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grave (plural graves)

  1. Alternative form of gravey

Etymology 3

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Noun

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grave

  1. (Late Middle English) Alternative form of greyve

Etymology 4

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Noun

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grave

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of grove

Etymology 5

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Verb

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grave

  1. Alternative form of graven

Middle French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old French grave.

Noun

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grave f (plural graves)

  1. gravel

Descendants

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References

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  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (grave)

Middle High German

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Etymology

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From Old High German grāfo, grāvo, grāfio, grāvio (count, local judge).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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grâve m

  1. count, local judge

Declension

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  • grâve” Benecke, Georg Friedrich, Wilhelm Müller, and Friedrich Zarncke. Mittelhochdeutsches Wörterbuch: mit benutzung des Nachlasses von Benecke. Vol. 1. S. Hirzel, 1863.

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology 1

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From Old Norse grafa, from Proto-Germanic *grabaną, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrābʰ- (to dig, scratch, scrape).

Verb

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grave (imperative grav, present tense graver, passive graves, simple past gravde or grov, past participle gravd, present participle gravende)

  1. to dig
    grave utto excavate

Etymology 2

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From French grave (serious, low-pitched; back), from Middle French grave, from Old French grave, from Latin gravis (heavy, grave, serious), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷréh₂us (heavy), from *gʷreh₂- (heavy) + *-us (forms adjectives).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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grave m (definite singular graven, indefinite plural graver, definite plural gravene)

  1. Only used in accent grave (grave accent)

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Verb

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grave (present tense grev, past tense grov, past participle grave, passive infinitive gravast, present participle gravande, imperative grav)

  1. Alternative form of grava

Derived terms

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Old French

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Medieval Latin grava, from Gaulish *grawa, *growa, from Proto-Celtic *grāwā, related to Cornish grow (gravel), Breton grouan, and Welsh gro (gravel); ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *gʰr-eu-d-.

Noun

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grave oblique singularf (oblique plural graves, nominative singular grave, nominative plural graves)

  1. gravel

Descendants

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References

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  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (grave)

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: (Brazil) -avi, (Portugal) -avɨ
  • Hyphenation: gra‧ve

Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese grave, from Latin gravis (heavy; grave), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷréh₂us.

Adjective

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grave m or f (plural graves, comparable, comparative mais grave, superlative o mais grave or gravíssimo)

  1. serious; grave (having possible severe negative consequences)
    Synonyms: sério, severo
    Sofria de uma doença grave.
    He suffered from a serious disease.
  2. (of sound) low-pitched; grave (low in pitch or tone)
    Synonym: baixo
    Antonym: agudo
    O som da tuba é mais grave do que o do trombone.
    The sound of the tuba has a lower pitch than that of the trombone.
  3. grave; serious; sombre; austere; solemn (characterised by a dignified sense of seriousness)
    Synonyms: sério, austero, circunspecto, sisudo, solene
    O programa tinha um tom grave.
    The program had a serious tone.
  4. (physics) that falls down; that doesn’t float
    O balão não é um corpo grave.
    Balloons are not a falling body.
Derived terms
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Noun

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grave m (plural graves)

  1. (music) a low-pitched note
  2. (physics) a body that falls down

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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grave

  1. inflection of gravar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from Italian grave.

Adjective

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grave

  1. inflection of grav:
    1. genitive/dative feminine singular/plural
    2. nominative/accusative neuter plural

Adverb

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grave

  1. grave

Spanish

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Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Spanish grave, from Latin gravis. Cf. also the attested Old Spanish form grieve, from Early Medieval Latin grevis, which was more common in other Romance-speaking areas.[1]

Adjective

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grave m or f (masculine and feminine plural graves, superlative gravísimo)

  1. serious, grave
    Synonym: serio
  2. bass (sound)
    Synonym: bajo
    Antonym: agudo
  3. solemn
    Synonym: solemne
  4. (phonetics) paroxytone; stressed in the penultimate syllable
    Synonym: llano
    Coordinate terms: agudo, esdrújulo, sobresdrújulo
Derived terms
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Descendants
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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grave

  1. inflection of gravar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Further reading

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References

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Anagrams

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Swedish

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Adjective

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grave

  1. definite natural masculine singular of grav

Anagrams

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West Frisian

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Etymology

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From Old Frisian grava, from Proto-West Germanic *graban, from Proto-Germanic *grabaną.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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grave

  1. to dig

Inflection

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Strong class 6
infinitive grave
3rd singular past groef
past participle groeven
infinitive grave
long infinitive graven
gerund graven n
auxiliary hawwe
indicative present tense past tense
1st singular graaf groef
2nd singular graafst groefst
3rd singular graaft groef
plural grave groeven
imperative graaf
participles gravend groeven

Further reading

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  • grave”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011