Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sooth, from Old English sōþ(truth", also "true, actual, real), from Proto-Germanic *sanþaz(truth; true), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁sónts, *es-ont-(being, existence, real, true), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es-, *es-(to be). Akin to Old Saxon sōþ(true), Old High German sand(true), Old Norse sannr(true), Gothic 𐍃𐌿𐌽𐌾𐌰(sunja, truth), Old English sēon(to be), Old English synn(sin, guilt"; literally, "being the one guilty). More at sin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sooth ‎(uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Truth.
    • William Shakespeare (Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene 1)
      In sooth, I know not why I am so sad.
    • Longfellow
      In good sooth, / Its mystery is love, its meaning youth.
  2. (obsolete) augury; prognostication
    • Spenser
      The sooth of birds, by beating of their wings.
  3. (obsolete) blandishment; cajolery
  4. (obsolete) reality; fact

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sooth ‎(comparative soother, superlative soothest)

  1. (archaic) True.
    • Spenser
      That shall I sooth (said he) to you declare.
  2. (obsolete) Pleasing; delightful; sweet.
    • Milton
      the soothest shepherd that ever piped on plains
    • Keats
      with jellies soother than the creamy curd

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sūþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

AdjectiveEdit

sooth ‎(not comparable)

  1. south

AdverbEdit

sooth ‎(not comparable)

  1. south

NounEdit

sooth ‎(uncountable)

  1. south