sooth

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English sooth, from Old English sōþ (truth", also "true, actual, real), from Proto-Germanic *sanþaz (truth; true), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁sónts, *es-ont- (being, existence, real, true), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁es-, *es- (to be). Akin to Old Saxon sōþ (true), Old High German sand (true), Old Norse sannr (true), Gothic 𐍃𐌿𐌽𐌾𐌰 (sunja, truth), Old English sēon (to be), Old English synn (sin, guilt"; literally, "being the one guilty). More at sin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sooth (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Truth.
    • William Shakespeare (Merchant of Venice, Act I, Scene 1)
      In sooth, I know not why I am so sad.
    • Longfellow
      In good sooth, / Its mystery is love, its meaning youth.
  2. (obsolete) augury; prognostication
    • Spenser
      The sooth of birds, by beating of their wings.
  3. (obsolete) blandishment; cajolery
  4. (obsolete) reality; fact

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sooth (comparative soother, superlative soothest)

  1. (archaic) True.
    • Spenser
      That shall I sooth (said he) to you declare.
  2. (obsolete) Pleasing; delightful; sweet.
    • Milton
      the soothest shepherd that ever piped on plains
    • Keats
      with jellies soother than the creamy curd

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sooth (not comparable)

  1. south

AdverbEdit

sooth (not comparable)

  1. south

NounEdit

sooth (uncountable)

  1. south
Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 15:06