See also: teit and -teit

Middle IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish téit.

VerbEdit

téit (conjunct ·tét, verbal noun techt or dul)

  1. to go, come
    • c. 1000, Anonymous; published in (1935) , Rudolf Thurneysen, editor, Scéla Mucca Meic Dathó, Dublin: Staionery Office, § 1, l. 11, 13, page 1: “In fer no·t⟨h⟩ēged iarsint ṡligi do·bered in n-aēl isin coiri, ocus a·taibred din chētgabāil, iss ed no·ithed. [Each man who came along the passage would put the flesh-fork into the cauldron, and whatever he got at the first taking, it was that which he ate.]”

InflectionEdit

  • Third person singular imperfect indicative: ·téged

DescendantsEdit

  • Irish: téigh
  • Scottish Gaelic: rach

Further readingEdit

MutationEdit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
téit théit téit
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

The present stem is from Proto-Celtic *tēgeti, from Proto-Indo-European *stéygʰeti. The origin of the anomalous third-person singular téit is unclear, and multiple explanations exist. The regular form would be *téigid.

The preterite active stem is from Proto-Celtic *ludet, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ludʰét (to arrive) (compare Sanskrit अरुधत् (arudhát), Ancient Greek ἦλθον (êlthon), ἤλυθον (ḗluthon), Tocharian A läc. The preterite passive stem is from Proto-Celtic *itos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁itós, from *h₁ey- (to go).

The future stem is from Proto-Celtic *rigāti, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁r̥gʰ-, zero grade of *h₁ergʰ- (to go, move) (compare Ancient Greek ἔρχομαι (érkhomai)). The second-person imperatives may be from the full grade of the same root, or they may be from *exs- (out) + *regeti (to stretch), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ-.

The perfective stem is from dí- +‎ com- +‎ feidid (to lead), from Proto-Celtic *wedeti, from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰ-.

VerbEdit

téit (conjunct ·tét, verbal noun techt or dul)

  1. to go
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 15b28
      A mbás tíagme-ni do·áirci bethid dúibsi .i. is ar bethid dúibsi tíagmi-ni bás.
      The death to which we go causes life to you pl, i.e. it is for the sake of life to you that we go to death.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 54b12
      ná cumgat .i. tíagat for teiched
      Let them not be able, i.e. let them go in flight
InflectionEdit

Perfective forms based on do·cuat

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

téit

  1. inflection of tét:
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/vocative/accusative dual

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
téit théit téit
pronounced with /d(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.