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See also: Lod, LoD, LOD, loď, lód, lóð, löd, and lød

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

lod (plural lods)

  1. (statistics, initialism) Logarithm of odds; A measure of likelihood calculated by taking the log of the ratio of the probability of a hypothesis being true given the observed data over the probability that the hypothesis is false.
    • 1999, Jurg Ott, Analysis of Human Genetic Linkage, →ISBN, page 66:
      Some computer programs furnish p-values rather than maximum lod scores.
    • 2001, Anatoly Ruvinsky & J. Sampson, The Genetics of the Dog, →ISBN, page 336:
      Markers were analysed in decreasing order of informativeness; a marker was only added to the map when it could be localized to a unique interval with a lod score of >= 3.0.
    • 2004, T. Strachan & Andrew P. Read, Human Molecular Genetics 3, →ISBN, page 406:
      Note that only recombinantion fractions between 0 and 0.5 are meaningful, and that all lod scores are zero at (theta)=0.5 (because they are then measuring the ratio of two identical probabilities, and log10(1)=0).

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German lōt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lod n (singular definite loddet, plural indefinite lodder)

  1. plumb bob
  2. lead (plummet to measure depth of water)
  3. sinker (weight used in fishing)
  4. lot (weight unit). A Danish lod was 15.6 grams. In this sense the plural is lod.
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hlutr. Compare Old English hlot (English lot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lod n or c (singular definite loddet or lodden, plural indefinite lodder)

  1. ticket n
  2. lot, prize n
  3. fate, lot c
  4. portion, share c
  5. lot, plot c

Etymology 3Edit

See lodde (to solder).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lod

  1. imperative of lodde

Etymology 4Edit

See lade (to let, leave, have).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lod

  1. past tense of lade

Further readingEdit


Lower SorbianEdit

 
lod

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ledъ. Cognate with Upper Sorbian lód, Polish lód, Czech led, Russian лёд (ljod), Old Church Slavonic ледъ (ledŭ).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lod m (diminutive lodk)

  1. ice (water in frozen form)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • lod in Ernst Muka/Mucke (St. Petersburg and Prague 1911–28): Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow / Wörterbuch der nieder-wendischen Sprache und ihrer Dialekte. Reprinted 2008, Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.
  • lod in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

lod

  1. first/second-person singular preterite absolute of téit

·lod

  1. first/second-person singular preterite conjunct of téit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
lod
also llod after a proclitic
lod
pronounced with /l(ʲ)-/
lod
also llod after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ledъ

NounEdit

lod m

  1. ice

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish lodh, from Middle Low German lot, from Proto-Germanic *laudą. Cognate with German Lot, English lead.

NounEdit

lod n

  1. a plumb bob, a plummet, a weight (hanging)
    1. a tool used to determine the depth of water
    2. a tool used in construction to find a vertical line
    3. a weight used to power a clock
    4. a weight used in a loom
    5. a weight used in a steelyard balance
    6. a piece of metal used to heat a (non-electric) flat iron
  2. solder (metal used in soldering)
  3. a lot; an old weight unit corresponding to 1/30 or 1/32 pound

DeclensionEdit

Declension of lod 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lod lodet lod loden
Genitive lods lodets lods lodens

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit