See also: tàctic

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek τακτικός (taktikós, fit for ordering), from τάσσω (tássō, to order, to arrange).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtæktɪk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æktɪk

NounEdit

tactic (plural tactics)

  1. A maneuver, or action calculated to achieve some end.
    • 2019 September 10, Jonathan Guyer, The American Prospect[1], number Fall 2019:
      Omar has challenged Elliott Abrams’s record in Latin America, taken a firm line against Saudi Arabia and the Emirates, and advocated for—wait for it—the two-state solution for Israel and Palestine (even though the headlines have focused on her expressing support for the right to boycott as a tactic).
    Synonyms: scheme, stratagem, plan, maneuver, course of action
    Coordinate term: strategy
  2. (military) A maneuver used against an enemy.
  3. (chess) A sequence of moves that limits the opponent's options and results in an immediate and tangible advantage, typically in the form of material.

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AdjectiveEdit

tactic (comparative more tactic, superlative most tactic)

  1. (dated, military) Tactical; of or relating to the art of military and naval tactics.
    Synonym: tactical
    • 1831, Thomas Campbell, The Power of Russia
      But time will teach the Russ, ev'n conquering War
      Has handmaid arts: aye, aye, the Russ will woo
      All sciences that speed Bellona's car,
      All murder's tactic arts, and win them too []
  2. (chemistry) Describing a polymer whose repeat units are identical.

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