CebuanoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ta‧gad

NounEdit

tagad

  1. attention

VerbEdit

tagad

  1. To direct or give attention.

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Native development. Probably from an otherwise unattested stem of unknown origin + -ad (frequentative verb-forming suffix).[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈtɒɡɒd]
  • Hyphenation: ta‧gad
  • Rhymes: -ɒd

VerbEdit

tagad

  1. (transitive) to deny

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • tagad in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tagad

  1. (archaic, Munster) first-person singular present subjunctive of tar
    go dtagadthat I may come

Usage notesEdit

The standard form is analytic: go dtaga .

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
tagad thagad dtagad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

There are two main theories about the origin of this word. Both derived the first syllable from Proto-Baltic *ta-, from Proto-Indo-European *to-, an old pronominal stem, whence also tas (this). The second syllable is, according to one theory, from the particle ga and an extra -d (< da). The same particle ga can be found in Lithuanian tàgatės (thus, like that) and Old Prussian anga (or), and in reduced form in 17th-century arīg (modern arī “too”) and as dz (< *dzi < parallel form *gi) in nedz). An alternative theory, however, derives the second syllable in tagad from gads, now “year” but previously also “time”: from an earlier accusative *tagadi (this time) would have come present-day tagad “now.” Cognates include Old Church Slavonic тогда (togda), тъгда (tŭgda), Russian тогда́ (togdá), Ukrainian тогді́ (tohdí), тогі́д (tohíd, last year), Bulgarian тога́ (togá), Czech tehdy, dialectal tehda (then).[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

tagad

  1. now (at the present moment)
    atnāciet rīt, tagad man nav laikacome tomorrow, now I don't have time
    bet tagad pastāstiet kaut ko interesantu!but now tell (us) something interesting!
    runāt vajag tikai par to, kas ir zināms; bet, ko nezini, to iemācies un iepazīsti... bet tagad, marš, gulēt!can only speak about that which is knowable; that which you don't know, learn and get to know it... but now, march! to sleep!
    Synonyms: pašlaik, pašreiz, patlaban, šobrīd
  2. now, nowadays (in the time period that includes the present)
    manā laikā maršala zižļu dēļ tā neuztraucās kā tagad par tabakdozēmin my day they wouldn't worry about a marshall's baton the way they now do about a tobacco box
    kur septiņpadsmitā gadsimta sākumā bija Līvas upītes ieteka, tur tagad Līvas ielawhere in the beginning of the 17th century was the estuary of the Līva river, there now is Līva street
    Synonyms: mūsdienās, šodien, tagadnē

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992) , “tagad”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN