nowadays

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From now +‎ adays.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈnaʊ.ə.deɪz/
  • (file)

AdverbEdit

nowadays (not comparable)

  1. At the present time; in the current era. [from 14th c.]
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “A Midsommer Nights Dreame”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene i], page 152, column 2:
      Me-thinkes miſtreſſe, you ſhould haue little reaſon for that: and yet to ſay the truth, reaſon and loue keepe little company together, now-adayes.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, “Cowardize, the Mother of Crueltie”, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821, page 399:
      What is it that now adayes makes all our quarrells mortall?
    • 1762, A. F. Busching, A New System of Geography, volume 4, translated from German, p.4:
      The appellation of Germany, is seldom used now-a-days any where but in the title of the Emperor and Elector of Mentz.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 6, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      And in his spare moments, of which there were not many nowadays, he would go alone to the quarry, collect a load of broken stone, and drag it down to the site of the windmill unassisted.
    • 2012, Dick Vinegar, The Guardian, 11 Jun 2012:
      My favourite reading nowadays is Pulse, one of the house magazines for GPs.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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