terminus

See also: Terminus

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin terminus (boundary, limit). Doublet of term.

NounEdit

terminus (plural termini or terminuses)

  1. The end or final point of something.
  2. The end point of a transportation system, or the town or city in which it is located.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 171:
      My brother supposes they must have filled outside London, for at that time the furious terror of the people had rendered the central termini impossible.
    • 2020 May 20, Paul Bigland, “East London Line's renaissance”, in Rail, page 49:
      Thirty-five years ago, many journeys around London meant having to pass through the centre of the capital. That's no longer the case, which takes real pressure off the city's termini as well as underground routes such as the Circle Line.
  3. A boundary or border, or a post or stone marking such a boundary.

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English terminus, an unadapted borrowing from Latin terminus. Doublet of terme.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɛʁ.mi.nys/
  • (file)

NounEdit

terminus m (uncountable)

  1. terminus

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *termenos, from Proto-Indo-European *térmn̥ (boundary). Cognate with Ancient Greek τέρμα (térma, a goal), τέρμων (térmōn, a border).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

terminus m (genitive terminī); second declension

  1. a boundary, limit, end
    Synonyms: fīnis, līmes, mēta, dēfīnītiō, granicia
  2. (Medieval Latin) word, term, definition
    Synonyms: verbum, dēfīnītiō
  3. (Medieval Latin) due date, a time to convene
    Synonyms: diēs, conventus
  4. (Medieval Latin) mode, wise, fashion, manner
    Synonyms: ratiō, modus, fōrma

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative terminus terminī
Genitive terminī terminōrum
Dative terminō terminīs
Accusative terminum terminōs
Ablative terminō terminīs
Vocative termine terminī

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • terminus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • terminus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • terminus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • terminus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the empire reaches to the ends of the world: imperium orbis terrarum terminis definitur
    • to set bounds to a thing, limit it: terminis circumscribere aliquid
  • terminus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • terminus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray