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See also: Tingle

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tinglen, a variant of tinclen (to tinkle). More at tinkle.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tingle (third-person singular simple present tingles, present participle tingling, simple past and past participle tingled)

  1. To ring
  2. To cause to ring
  3. To have a prickling or mildly stinging sensation.
    • 1913 Eleanor Porter: Pollyanna: Chapter 8:
      For five minutes Pollyanna worked swiftly, deftly, combing a refractory curl into fluffiness, perking up a drooping ruffle at the neck, or shaking a pillow into plumpness so that the head might have a better pose. Meanwhile the sick woman, frowning prodigiously, and openly scoffing at the whole procedure, was, in spite of herself, beginning to tingle with a feeling perilously near to excitement.
  4. To make ringing sounds, to twang.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 13
      Sideways leaning, we sideways darted; every ropeyarn tingling like a wire; the two tall masts buckling like Indian canes in land tornadoes.
    • Charles Dickens
      sharp tingling bells
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

tingle (plural tingles)

  1. A prickling or stinging sensation.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit