See also: tööt

EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

Probably onomatopoetic in origin, compare Dutch toeteren (to blow a horn) and German tuten (to blow a horn).

Alternative formsEdit

  • tout (in some verb senses only)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tuːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːt

NounEdit

toot (countable and uncountable, plural toots)

  1. The noise of a horn or whistle.
    He gave a little toot of the horn, to get their attention.
  2. (by extension, informal) A fart; flatus.
  3. (uncountable, slang) Cocaine.
  4. (countable, slang) A portion of cocaine that a person snorts.
    • 1981, New York Magazine (volume 14, number 35, page 30)
      So he took a toot. A couple of days later he did another, then another. Soon Harry was using more coke than he had done in his whole life.
  5. (informal) A spree of drunkness.
  6. (informal, uncountable, pronounced /tʊt/) Rubbish; tat.
    I'm not paying fifty pounds for this load of old toot!
  7. (Internet) A message on the social networking software Mastodon.
    • 2017 April 4, Madison Malone Kircher, “What the Heck Is Mastodon, and Why Is Everyone Talking About It?”, in New York Magazine:
      As for layout, Mastodon feels a little like TweetDeck, with columns for your toots, toots from the people you follow, your mentions, and (unlike Twitter) a timeline of all public posts being shared by every user on the platform.
    • 2017 April 5, “Mastodon is here; will you stop tweeting and start tooting?”, in The Indian Express:
      Interestingly, Mastodon offers a bit more in that aspect for toots can be 500 characters long.
    • 2017 April 5, Jack Morse, “Bye, Twitter. All the cool kids are migrating to Mastodon”, in Mashable Australia:
      Mastodon users can send toots with 500 characters as opposed to Twitter's 140. But that's not the only difference. Individual toots can be marked as private, meaning you don't have to choose between a public or a private account like on Twitter.
    • 2018 August 24, Beth Skwarecki, “A Beginner's Guide to Mastodon”, in Lifehacker:
      So if I follow Nick, his toots (yep, they're called toots) will show up in wandering.shop's federated timeline.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

toot (third-person singular simple present toots, present participle tooting, simple past and past participle tooted)

  1. To stand out, or be prominent.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Howell to this entry?)
  2. To peep; to look narrowly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Latimer to this entry?)
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender:
      Long wandering up and downe the land, With bowe and bolts in either hand, For birds in bushes tooting.
  3. To see; to spy.
  4. (slang) To flatulate.
  5. To make the sound of a horn or whistle.
    • 1855, William Makepeace Thackeray, The Newcomes:
      The island rang, as yet, with the tooting horns and rattling teams of mail-coaches.
  6. To cause a horn or whistle to make its sound.
  7. (slang) To go on a drinking binge.
  8. (slang) To snort (a recreational drug).
    • 2008, Robert L. Glover, Street Corner Symphony: An American Story (page 65)
      I had graduated from the simple tooting cocaine up my nose to smoking it, which was a completely different experience and animal.
  9. To post a message on a Mastodon instance (a self-hosted version of the networking software).
    • 2017 April 5, “Mastodon is here; will you stop tweeting and start tooting?”, in The Indian Express:
      (see title)
    • 2017 April 5, Jack Morse, “Bye, Twitter. All the cool kids are migrating to Mastodon”, in Mashable Australia:
      Only want to toot in the Animal Rights instance? You can create an account there and do that.
    • 2018 February 8, Marie Boran, “Why tweet when you can toot on Mastodon”, in The Irish Times:
      One alternative to Fist is Mastodon, which looks and behaves a bit like Twitter (you don’t tweet, you “toot”).
    • 2018 August 24, Beth Skwarecki, “A Beginner's Guide to Mastodon”, in Lifehacker:
      Each instance has its own administrator and its own code of conduct, so make sure you read up before you toot.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps a contraction of toilet.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

toot (plural toots)

  1. (Australia, slang) A toilet.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Swedish tota, dial. tåta.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

toot (preterite totä)

  1. (with dill) To attempt; to try to imitate as best you can; mimic.[1]
    Han totä dill sä gódt’n kondHe tried to imitate as best he could.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rietz, Johan Ernst, “Toot”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 747