See also: TUT, Tut, tút, and tût

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Imitative.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tʌt/, [ǀ]
  • Rhymes: -ʌt
  • (file)

InterjectionEdit

tut

  1. Tut tut; an expression of disapproval.
  2. Hush; be silent.
SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

tut (third-person singular simple present tuts, present participle tutting, simple past and past participle tutted)

  1. To make a tut tut sound of disapproval.

Etymology 2Edit

Shortening of tutorial.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tut (plural tuts)

  1. (Internet slang) A tutorial.
    • 2002, "Little Penny", Looking for sites, tuts, videos to learn html (newbie) (on newsgroup alt.html)

Etymology 3Edit

Compare Swedish tut (a point, pipe, tube), Danish tut (a cornet).

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA or enPR then please add some!

NounEdit

tut (plural tuts)

  1. An imperial ensign consisting of a golden globe with a cross on it.
  2. (Britain, obsolete, dialect) A hassock.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

tut (plural tuts)

  1. (obsolete) A piece of work.

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

tut (uncountable)

  1. (Southern England) Rubbish.
    • 1977, Ian Drury & the Blockheads, Clever Trevor
      Such stupidness is mad 'cause nothing underfoot comes to nothing less to add to a load of old tut.
    • 2012, M.T. Maguire, The Wrong Stuff: K'Barthan Series: Part 2
      Cracking excuse: credible, watertight and yet patently a load of old tut.
    • 2017, Marilyn Messik, Witch Dust
      “Well there's a load of old tut in the cupboard next to Felicia's room,” she said grudgingly.

VerbEdit

tut (third-person singular simple present tuts, present participle tutting, simple past and past participle tutted)

  1. (obsolete) To work by the piece; to carry out tut-work.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for tut in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


AmanabEdit

NounEdit

tut

  1. milk

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus. Compare Romanian tot.

AdjectiveEdit

tut m (feminine tutã or tute, masculine plural tuts, feminine plural tuti/tute)

  1. all

Derived termsEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian توت(tut). Ultimate origin uncertain.

NounEdit

tut (definite accusative tutu, plural tutlar)

  1. mulberry

DeclensionEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German tūte (thing shaped like a horn), compare also German Tüte (bag) and (an older loan from Low German) Danish tud (spout). Possibly from Proto-Germanic *þeutǭ (pipe) with an irregular (onomatopoeic?) treatment of the initial consonant.

NounEdit

tut c (singular definite tutten, plural indefinite tutter)

  1. stall (a cover to a finger)
  2. roll (a roll of coins)
InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Derived from the verb tutte.

NounEdit

tut n (singular definite tuttet, plural indefinite tut)

  1. toot
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tut f (plural tutten, diminutive tutje n)

  1. a stiff wooden woman
  2. (chiefly Belgium) a pacifier
    Synonym: fopspeen

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tut

  1. third-person singular past historic of taire

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tut

  1. third-person singular present of tun
    Es tut mir leid.
    I am sorry.
  2. inflection of tun:
    1. second-person plural present
    2. plural imperative

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic تُوت(tūt).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tut m (collective, singulative tuta, plural tuti)

  1. blackberry
  2. mulberry

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

tut m (definite singular tuten, indefinite plural tuter, definite plural tutene)

  1. spout (on a teapot etc.)

Etymology 2Edit

From the verb tute

NounEdit

tut n (definite singular tutet, indefinite plural tut, definite plural tuta or tutene)

  1. toot

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

tut

  1. imperative of tute

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

tut m (definite singular tuten, indefinite plural tutar, definite plural tutane)

  1. spout (on a teapot, etc.)

Etymology 2Edit

From the verb tute

NounEdit

tut n (definite singular tutet, indefinite plural tut, definite plural tuta)

  1. toot

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tut m (oblique and nominative feminine singular tute)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of tot

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

tut

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of tot

PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tōtus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tut

  1. all

PronounEdit

tut

  1. everything, all
  2. anything

NounEdit

tut m

  1. whole

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin tōtus.

AdverbEdit

tut

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) all
Alternative formsEdit
  • tot (Surmiran)
  • tuot (Puter, Vallader)

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

tut m (plural tuts)

  1. (Sursilvan) nap
SynonymsEdit

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tut n

  1. The sound of a car horn or a train's whistle; honk.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of tut 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tut tutet tut tuten
Genitive tuts tutets tuts tutens

TurkishEdit

VerbEdit

tut

  1. second-person singular imperative of tutmak

AntonymsEdit


VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tūt m

  1. death

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

tut (nominative plural tuts)

  1. tooth

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ZazakiEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tut/
  • Hyphenation: tut

NounEdit

tut m

  1. child