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Etymology 1

Recorded since circa 1405, from Middle French poupe, from Italian poppa, from Latin puppis, all meaning "stern of a ship".

Noun

poop (countable and uncountable, plural poops)

  1. The stern of a ship.
Derived terms
Synonyms
Antonyms
Translations

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (transitive) To break seawater with the poop of a vessel, especially the poop deck.
    • We were pooped within hailing of the quay and were nearly sunk.
  2. (transitive) To embark a ship over the stern.

Etymology 2

Origin uncertain, possibly from Middle English poupen.

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To make a short blast on a horn [from late 14th c.]
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To break wind. [from 18th c.]
  3. (intransitive) To defecate.
    His horse pooped right in the middle of the parade.
Translations

Noun

poop (countable and uncountable, plural poops)

  1. (often childish) Fecal matter, feces. [from the 18th c.]
    • The dog took a poop on the grass.
  2. The sound of a steam engine's whistle; typically low pitch.
    2001, Rev. W. Awdry, Thomas the tank engine collection : a unique collection of stories from the railway series - p. 157 - Egmont Books, Limited, Aug 15, 2001
    Two minutes passed - five - seven- ten. "Poop! Poop!" Everyone knew that whistle, and a mighty cheer went up as the Queen's train glided into the station.
  3. (US, dated) information, facts.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations

Interjection

poop

  1. (childish, euphemistic) Expressing annoyed disappointment.

Etymology 3

  • Recorded in World War II (1941) Army slang poop sheet "up to date information", itself of uncertain origin, perhaps toilet paper referring to etymology 2.

Noun

poop (uncountable)

  1. A set of data or general information, written or spoken, usually concerning machinery or a process.
    • Here’s the info paper with the poop on that carburetor.

Etymology 4

Origin uncertain, perhaps sound imitation.

Verb

poop (third-person singular simple present poops, present participle pooping, simple past and past participle pooped)

  1. (transitive) To tire, exhaust. Often used with out. [from early 20th c.]
    • I'm pooped from working so hard
    • He pooped out a few strides from the finish line.
Translations

Etymology 5

Origin uncertain, perhaps a shortening of nincompoop.

Noun

poop (plural poops)

  1. A slothful person.
    • 1976, Kurt Vonnegut, Slapstick, Delacorte Press, Chapter 48, p. 224,
      Aside from battles, the history of nations seemed to consist of nothing but powerless old poops like myself, heavily medicated and vaguely beloved in the long ago, coming to kiss the boots of young psychopaths.
    • Hurry up, you old poop!
Translations

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