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Etymology

From Middle English ferten, farten, from Old English *feortan (attested as the gerund feorting), from Proto-Germanic *fertaną, from Proto-Indo-European *perd-.

The noun is from Middle English fert, fart, from the verb.

Pronunciation

Verb

fart (third-person singular simple present farts, present participle farting, simple past and past participle farted)

  1. (informal, impolite, intransitive) To emit digestive gases from the anus; to flatulate.
    Synonyms: beef, blow off, break wind, cut one loose, cut the cheese, flatulate; see also Thesaurus:flatulate
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, A Dialogue between Mad Mullinix and Timothy[1]:
      I fart with twenty ladies by; / They call me beast; and what care I?
  2. (colloquial, intransitive, usually as "fart around") To waste time with idle and inconsequential tasks; to go about one's activities in a lackadaisical manner; to be lazy or over-relaxed in one's manner or bearing.
    Synonyms: futz, fool around, fool about
  3. (figuratively, transitive) To emit (fumes, gases, etc.).

Usage notes

This term, although considered somewhat impolite, is not generally considered vulgar. It once was, and there still may be some that do consider it to be, so it is best avoided in polite discourse.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Noun

fart (plural farts)

  1. (informal) An emission of digestive gases from the anus; a flatus. [from 15th c.]
  2. (colloquial, impolite, derogatory) An irritating person; a fool.
  3. (colloquial, impolite, derogatory, potentially offensive) (usually as "old fart") An elderly person; especially one perceived to hold old-fashioned views.

Synonyms

emit flatulent gases
  • See also Thesaurus:flatus
  • Derived terms

    Translations

    See also

    Anagrams


    Catalan

    Etymology

    From Latin fartus.

    Pronunciation

    Adjective

    fart (feminine farta, masculine plural farts, feminine plural fartes)

    1. stuffed
    2. fed up

    Danish

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart, from Old Saxon fard, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz. See also Swedish färd, Dutch vaart, German Fahrt.

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /fart/, [fɑːˀd̥]

    Noun

    fart c (singular definite farten, plural indefinite farter)

    1. (uncountable) speed
      Mange trafikulykker sker på grund af for høj fart.Many accidents happen because of excessive speed.
      Synonym: hastighed (non-technical contexts)
    2. (physics) speed (magnitude of velocity, if seen as a vector)
    3. (sailing) trip; journey; trade.
      Der er en stigning i antallet af farter mellem Asien og Europa.There is an increase in the number of trades between Asia and Europe.
      At være på farten.To be on the move.

    Declension

    Derived terms

    References


    French

    Etymology

    Probably from Norwegian fart (travel, velocity, speed), from Middle Low German vart, Old High German vart, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz. Related to German Fahrt (journey, ride).

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    fart m (plural farts)

    1. wax (for skis)

    Further reading


    Hungarian

    Etymology

    far +‎ -t

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [ˈfɒrt]
    • Hyphenation: fart

    Noun

    fart

    1. accusative singular of far

    Icelandic

    Etymology

    Borrowed from Danish fart.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    fart f (genitive singular fartar, no plural)

    1. (informal) speed
      Það er nú meiri fartin á þér, drengur!My, you sure seem to be in a hurry, son!

    Declension


    Norwegian Bokmål

    Etymology 1

    From Middle Low German vart, related to fare (fare, travel).

    Noun

    fart m (definite singular farten, indefinite plural farter, definite plural fartene)

    1. velocity, speed
      Synonyms: hastighet, tempo
    2. movement, motion
      Synonyms: bevegelse, gang
    3. transportation
      Synonyms: ferdsel, reise, tur
    4. high speed, vigor, drive
      Synonyms: driv, fres, liv
    Derived terms

    Etymology 2

    See the etymology of the main entry.

    Verb

    fart

    1. past participle of fare

    References

    • “fart” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
    • fart” in The Ordnett Dictionary

    Norwegian Nynorsk

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    fart m (definite singular farten, indefinite plural fartar, definite plural fartane)

    1. speed, velocity
    2. movement, motion
    3. transport, transportation, traffic

    Derived terms

    References


    Old High German

    Alternative forms

    Etymology

    From Proto-Germanic *fardiz, whence also Old English fierd, Old Norse ferð.

    Noun

    fart f

    1. trip
    2. ride

    Descendants

    • German: Fahrt

    Polish

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): /fart/
    • (file)

    Noun

    fart m inan

    1. (colloquial) luck
      Synonym: szczęście
      Antonyms: niefart, pech
    2. (colloquial) fluke; stroke of luck
      Synonyms: fuks, łut szczęścia

    Declension

    Antonyms

    Further reading

    • fart in Polish dictionaries at PWN

    Swedish

    Etymology

    From Middle Low German vart, from Old Saxon fard, from Proto-Germanic *fardiz. Cognate with Swedish färd, Dutch vaart, German Fahrt.

    Pronunciation

    Noun

    fart c

    1. speed
      • 1917, Bible, Jeremiah 48:16:
        Snart kommer Moabs ofärd, och hans olycka hastar fram med fart.
        Soon comes Moab’s calamity, and his misery hastes with speed.
      • 1944, Pär Lagerkvist, Dvärgen; translated as Alexandra Dick, transl., The Dwarf, 1945:
        Jag ropade åt körsvennen att sätta upp farten, han klatschade med piskan och vi for iväg.
        I called to the driver to increase his pace; he cracked his whip and we rolled on.


    Usage notes

    • As a suffix in certain compounds (listed separately below) this word takes on the meaning of "road", "ramp" or "journey", just like German Fahrt or Swedish färd, rather than the standalone meaning of speed. Similar compounds with the suffix -färd exist, with slightly different meaning.
    • In many compounds and in more formal or scientific use, speed translates to hastighet (velocity) rather than fart.

    Declension

    Declension of fart 
    Singular Plural
    Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
    Nominative fart farten farter farterna
    Genitive farts fartens farters farternas

    Derived terms

    Compounds with the meaning of road, ramp, or journey

    See also