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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French torrent, from Italian torrente, from Latin torrentem, accusative of torrēns (burning, seething, roaring), from Latin torrēre (to parch, scorch).

NounEdit

torrent (plural torrents)

  1. A violent flow, as of water, lava, etc.; a stream suddenly raised and running rapidly, as down a precipice.
    • (Can we date this quote by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      The roaring torrent is deep and wide.
    • 2013 June 29, “High and wet”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 28:
      Floods in northern India, mostly in the small state of Uttarakhand, have wrought disaster on an enormous scale. [] Rock-filled torrents smashed vehicles and homes, burying victims under rubble and sludge.
    Rain fell on the hills in torrents.
    A torrent of green and white water broke over the hull of the sail-boat.
  2. (figuratively) A large amount or stream of something.
    • 2011 December 21, Helen Pidd, “Europeans migrate south as continent drifts deeper into crisis”, in the Guardian:
      A new stream of migrants is leaving the continent. It threatens to become a torrent if the debt crisis continues to worsen.
    • 1906, Alfred Noyes, The Highwayman:
      The wind was a torrent of darkness among the gusty trees, / The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, / The road was a ribbon of moonlight over the purple moor ...
    They endured a torrent of inquiries.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

torrent (comparative more torrent, superlative most torrent)

  1. Rolling or rushing in a rapid stream.
    • (Can we date this quote by Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Waves of torrent fire.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From BitTorrent and the file extension it uses for metadata (.torrent).

NounEdit

torrent (plural torrents)

  1. (Internet, file sharing) A set of files obtainable through a peer-to-peer network, especially BitTorrent.
    I got a torrent of the complete works of Shakespeare the other day; I'm not sure why.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

torrent (third-person singular simple present torrents, present participle torrenting, simple past and past participle torrented)

  1. (Internet slang, transitive) To download in a torrent.
    The video rental place didn't have the film I was after, but I managed to torrent it.

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

torrent m (plural torrents)

  1. current

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin torrens

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

torrent m (plural torrents)

  1. A torrent

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

torrent

  1. (literary) third-person plural imperfect/conditional of torri
  2. (literary) third-person plural imperative of torri

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
torrent dorrent nhorrent thorrent
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.