See also: Trone, troné, trône, and trôné

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare French trogne (a belly).

NounEdit

trone (plural trones)

  1. (Britain, dialect) A small drain.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English trone (balance), from Anglo-Norman trone, tron, from Late Latin trona, from Latin trutina (a balance).

NounEdit

trone (plural trones)

  1. (Britain, dialect) A steelyard.
  2. (Britain, dialect, Scotland, obsolete) A form of weighing machine for heavy wares, consisting of two horizontal bars crossing each other, beaked at the extremities, and supported by a wooden pillar.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for trone in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, seat, throne).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /troːnə/, [ˈtˢʁ̥oːnə]

NounEdit

trone c (singular definite tronen, plural indefinite troner)

  1. throne

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

trone (imperative tron, infinitive at trone, present tense troner, past tense tronede, perfect tense har tronet)

  1. to throne

DutchEdit

VerbEdit

trone

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of tronen

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French trone, trosne, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɔːn(ə)/, /ˈtroːn(ə)/

NounEdit

trone (plural trones)

  1. A throne; a royal or regal seat or chair:
    • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[1], published c. 1410, Apocalips 4:4, page 118v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
      ⁊ in þe cumpas of þe ſeete.· weren foure ⁊ twentı ſmale ſeetıs ⁊ abouen þe troones foure ⁊ twentı eldere men ſıttynge. hılıd aboute wıþ whıte cloþıs.· ⁊ in þe heedıs of hem golden coꝛouns
      And around the perimeter of the seat there were twenty-four small seats, and on those seats twenty-four elders sat, wearing white clothing and having golden crowns on their heads.
    1. A throne which signifies the might and potency of a monarch.
    2. A throne which signifies the might and potency of a deity.
      • c. 1395, John Wycliffe, John Purvey [et al.], transl., Bible (Wycliffite Bible (later version), MS Lich 10.)‎[2], published c. 1410, Apocalips 4:5, page 118v, column 1; republished as Wycliffe's translation of the New Testament, Lichfield: Bill Endres, 2010:
        ⁊ leıtıs ⁊ voıces ⁊ þundꝛıngıs camen out of þe troone. ⁊ ſeuene laumpıs bꝛennynge bıfoꝛe þe troone.· whıche ben þe ſeuene ſpırıtıs of god
        And lightning, sounds, and thunder came out of the throne, and seven lamps were burning in front of the throne, which are the seven spirits of God.
    3. (rare) A throne which signifies the authority of a cleric.
  2. One's spot, stead or place in heaven.
  3. One of several ranks of angels, being above "dominions" and below "cherubim".
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: throne
  • Scots: throne
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Anglo-Norman trone, tron, from Late Latin trona, from Latin trutina (balance).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrɔn(ə)/, /ˈtrɔːn(ə)/

NounEdit

trone (plural tronys) (rare)

  1. A set of scales or balance; a machine used to weigh.
  2. The location of weighing equipment used as a place to humiliate criminals.
  3. One of the planks used to make the Holy Cross.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia nbWikipedia nb

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair”, “throne).

NounEdit

trone f or m (definite singular trona or tronen, indefinite plural troner, definite plural tronene)

  1. (monarchy) throne
  2. (biblical) throne; the third highest order of angels

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

trone (imperative tron, present tense troner, simple past and past participle trona or tronet)

  1. To sit in a manner which commands obedience; to sit in a dominating way (as if on a throne).

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trone f (definite singular trona, indefinite plural troner, definite plural tronene)

  1. a throne

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair”, “throne).

NounEdit

trone m (oblique plural trones, nominative singular trones, nominative plural trone)

  1. throne

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (trone, supplement)