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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Afrikaans veld, from Dutch veld, veldt (field), from Proto-Germanic *fulþuz, *felþą. Doublet of field.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /vɛlt/, /vɛld/, /fɛlt/

NounEdit

veld (plural velds)

  1. The open pasture land or grassland of South Africa and neighboring countries.
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 79:
      Pale yellow and greyish brown, the bare veld of late summer lay flat and listless under the drab sky.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 11:
      From an early age, I spent most of my free time in the veld playing and fighting with the other boys of the village.
    • 2007, January 14, “Caroline Elkins”, in A Life Exposed[1]:
      For Holmes, Baartman’s journey as an object of European curiosity and African exploitation began on the veld of South Africa’s Eastern Cape.

TranslationsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch veld, from Middle Dutch velt, from Old Dutch feld, felt, from Proto-Germanic *felþą, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂-.

NounEdit

veld (plural velde, diminutive veldjie)

  1. field, open country
  2. patch or grass and/or other small plants
  3. veld, the open grassland of South Africa and neighboring countries
  4. sports field

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch velt (field), from Old Dutch feld, felt, from Proto-Germanic *felþą, from Proto-Indo-European *pelh₂-. Cognates include West Frisian fjild, English field and German Feld.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɛlt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛlt
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: veld

NounEdit

veld n (plural velden, diminutive veldje n)

  1. field, open country
  2. patch or grass and/or other small plants
  3. agricultural field
    Synonym: akker
  4. sports field
  5. (physics) field (physical phenomenon pervading an area)
  6. field, domain of knowledge

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ veld; in: J. de Vries & F. de Tollenaere, "Etymologisch Woordenboek", Uitgeverij Het Spectrum, Utrecht, 1986 (14de druk)

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

veld

  1. Alternative form of feeld