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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Translingual Venus (a genus of clams), from Latin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

venus (plural venuses)

  1. Any of the bivalve molluscs in the genus Venus or family Veneridae.

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

venus

  1. conditional of veni

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

venus

  1. masculine plural of the past participle of venir

IdoEdit

VerbEdit

venus

  1. conditional of venar

LatinEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *wes- (to sell, buy). Cognate with vīlis, Ancient Greek ὦνος (ônos), ὠνέομαι (ōnéomai, to buy), Sanskrit वस्नयति (vasnayati, to haggle), वस्न (vasna, price).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vēnus m (genitive vēnūs); fourth declension

  1. sale, purchase

DeclensionEdit

Fourth-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vēnus vēnūs
Genitive vēnūs vēnuum
Dative vēnuī vēnibus
Accusative vēnum vēnūs
Ablative vēnū vēnibus
Vocative vēnus vēnūs

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Venus, borrowed from Latin Venus. So named because of its astrological association with the planet.

NounEdit

venus (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The reddish-brown metal; copper.
    • 1475, The Book of Quintessence.
      This water forsoþe is so strong, þat if a litil drope þerof falle vpon ȝoure hond, anoon it wole perce it þoruȝ-out; and in þe same maner it wole do, if it falle vpon a plate of venus.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vēnōsus.

AdjectiveEdit

venus

  1. venous