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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French virgule, from Latin virgula (twig; scratch comma), from virga (rod, branch) + -ulus (forming diminutives).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈvəː.ɡjuːl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvɝ.ɡjul/
  • (file)

NounEdit

virgule (plural virgules)

  1. (typography, obsolete or historical) A medieval punctuation mark similar to the slash/⟩ or pipe|⟩ and used as a scratch comma and caesura mark.
  2. (typography, dated) A slash, ⟨/⟩ or ⟨⟩, particularly (literature) in its use to mark line breaks within quotes.
  3. (typography, dated) A pipe, ⟨|⟩, particularly (poetry) in its use to mark metrical feet.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin virgula, diminutive of virga (rod, branch).

NounEdit

virgule f

  1. divining rod

FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin virgula, diminutive of virga (rod, branch).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virgule f (plural virgules)

  1. comma (punctuation mark)
  2. (mathematics) decimal point (see usage notes)
    En Europe continentale, la virgule permet de noter la partie décimale; pi vaut environ 3,1415. — In continental Europe, the comma is used to denote the decimal part; pi is about 3.1415.
Usage notesEdit
  • In France, unlike in English-speaking countries, a comma is used to separate the whole and decimal parts of a decimal, while a space (gap) is used to mark off thousands. So "100,000.9" ("one-hundred thousand point 9") is written in French as "100 000,9".
  • In mathematics, the translation is "decimal point", but "comma" can be a more appropriate translation. For example, il y a trois décimales après la virgule translates as there are three decimal places after the decimal point, but En France, on sépare la partie entière et la partie décimale avec une virgule is better translated as In France, you separate the whole and decimal parts with a comma rather than ... with a decimal point, as the former explains which symbol is used and the latter is misleading.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

virgule

  1. first-person singular present indicative of virguler

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

virgule

  1. third-person singular present indicative of virguler

Etymology 4Edit

VerbEdit

virgule

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of virguler

Etymology 5Edit

VerbEdit

virgule

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of virguler

Etymology 6Edit

VerbEdit

virgule

  1. second-person singular imperative of virguler

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin virgula, diminutive of virga (rod, branch).

NounEdit

virgule f (plural virgules)

  1. (Jersey) comma

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virgule f pl

  1. plural of virgulă