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AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

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VerbEdit

vivir

  1. to live

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin vīvere (to live), present active infinitive of vīvō.

VerbEdit

vivir

  1. to live

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin vīvere (to live), present active infinitive of vīvō.

VerbEdit

vivir (first-person singular present vivo, first-person singular preterite vivín, past participle vivido)

  1. to live
  2. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of vivir
  3. first/third-person singular personal infinitive of vivir

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


IdoEdit

VerbEdit

vivir

  1. past infinitive of vivar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish bivir, viver, vevir, bevir[1], from Latin vīvere (to live), present active infinitive of vīvō, from Proto-Italic *gʷīwō, from Proto-Indo-European *gʷíh₃weti (to live, be alive). Compare Ladino bivir, Portuguese viver.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /biˈbiɾ/, [biˈβiɾ]

NounEdit

vivir m (plural vivires)

  1. life; lifestyle

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

vivir (first-person singular present vivo, first-person singular preterite viví, past participle vivido)

  1. (intransitive) to live; to be alive
  2. (intransitive) to make a living, to live (on)
    Vive en migas, nada más.
    He lives on crumbs, nothing more.
  3. (intransitive) to live, reside, inhabit
    Vive en la casa roja.
    She lives in the red house.
    La pobrecita vive con dos hermanas crueles.
    The poor girl lives with two cruel sisters.
  4. (transitive) to experience, to live through
    • 2014, Pablo Martín de Santa Olalla Saludes, El laberinto italiano, Editorial Liber Factory (→ISBN), page 9
      Mientras nosotros tuvimos que vivir una dictadura de casi cuarenta años que nos dejó prácticamente aislados del resto de Europa, []
      While we had to live through a dictatorship of almost forty years that left us practically isolated from the rest of Europe, []

Usage notesEdit

  • Like many intransitive verbs in both Spanish and English, including English live, the verb vivir can take a cognate object; hence vivir la vida loca "to live the crazy life", which is roughly synonymous with vivir locamente "to live crazily".

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit