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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English waxen, from Old English weaxen, ġeweaxen, from Proto-Germanic *wahsanaz, past participle of Proto-Germanic *wahsijaną (to wax, grow, increase), equivalent to wax +‎ -en (past participle ending).

AdjectiveEdit

waxen (comparative more waxen, superlative most waxen)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Grown.

VerbEdit

waxen

  1. alternative past participle of wax.
  2. (obsolete) plural simple present form of wax
    • 1540, Great Bible, Second Edition, Preface
      And they that occupye them been in muche savegarde, and have greate consolacyon, and been the readyer unto all goodnesse, the slower to all evyll: and if they have done anything amysse, anone even by the sight of the bookes, theyr conscvences been admonished, and they waxen sory and ashamed of the facte.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
      When the rayne is faln, the cloudes wexen cleare.
    • c. 1590-97, William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream, II, i
      And then the whole quire hold their hips and laugh,
      And waxen in their mirth and neeze and swear
      A merrier hour was never wasted there.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English waxen, from Old English weaxen (waxen, made of wax), equivalent to wax +‎ -en (made of).

AdjectiveEdit

waxen (comparative more waxen, superlative most waxen)

  1. Made of wax; covered with wax.
    a waxen tablet
  2. Of or pertaining to wax.
  3. Having the pale smooth characteristics of wax, waxlike, waxy.
    • 1950, Mervyn Peake, Gormenghast, Penguin, 1969, Chapter 28, p. 185,[2]
      It was hard to imagine that the broken thing had once been new; that those withered, waxen cheeks had been fresh and tinted. That her eyes had long ago glinted with laughter.
  4. (rare) Easily effaced, as if written in wax.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit