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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain origin, first attested as 1960s slang. Compare English chit (pimple, wart), German Zitze (teat, nipple).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

NounEdit

zit (plural zits)

  1. (US, slang) pimple
    • 1968, J. Lawrence Hagen, "Pinball 1959", Generation volume 20–21, page 182:
      I can't help thinking how little good all that working out did him. I think the only thing he ever got out of it was more zits.
    • 1987Adventures in Babysitting, 00:06:35:
      Brad: Sara, did you take my Clearasil again? Sara: I ran out of brown (paint). Brad: Great. How am I supposed to cover up my zits?

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From zitten.

NounEdit

zit m (plural zitten, diminutive zitje n)

  1. the act of sitting
  2. (Belgium, by extension) an exam term at university or an institution of intermediate tertiary education
  3. seat
  4. (by extension) a seat in a legislative or regulatory group (e.g. in a parliament or a board)
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

zit

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of zitten
  2. imperative of zitten

Middle High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German zīt, from Proto-Germanic *tīdiz, from Proto-Indo-European *dīti- (time, period), from *dī- (time).

NounEdit

zīt f

  1. time

DescendantsEdit

  • Alemannic German: Ziit, Zit
  • Central Franconian: Zeck, Zick
  • German: Zeit
  • Hunsrik: Zeid
  • Luxembourgish: Zäit
  • Pennsylvania German: Zeit
  • Vilamovian: cajt
  • Yiddish: צײַט(tsayt)