Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 15:08

comer

See also: Comer

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

comer (plural comers)

  1. One in a race who is catching up to others and shows promise of winning.
  2. (figuratively) One who is catching up in some contest and has a likelihood of victory.
  3. One who arrives.
    The champ will face all comers.

QuotationsEdit

  • 2004 August 9 & 16, The New Yorker, page 40:
    The transition from comer to also-ran can be quick.
  • 2004 December 6, The New Yorker, page 105:
    Django, then, was not just a comer; he was a cause.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comedere, present active infinitive of comedō.

VerbEdit

comer (first-person singular indicative present como, past participle comíu)

  1. to eat

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comedere, present active infinitive of comedō.

VerbEdit

comer (first-person singular present como, first-person singular preterite comín, past participle comido)

  1. to eat

ConjugationEdit


MirandeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comedere, present active infinitive of comedō.

VerbEdit

comer

  1. to eat

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese comer (to eat), from Latin comedere, present active infinitive of comedō, from com- + edō (I eat). Edō from Proto-Italic *edō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed- (to eat).

Cognate with Galician comer, Mirandese comer, quemer, Asturian comer and Spanish comer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

comer (first-person singular present indicative como, past participle comido)

  1. (intransitive) to eat, to consume a meal
    comi hoje, obrigado. — “I've already eaten today, thanks.”
  2. (transitive) to eat, to consume a specific food
    Você come carne? — “Do you eat meat?”
  3. (transitive, chess, board games) to capture a piece
    Agora eu comi a torre e o bispo. — “Now I have captured the rook and the bishop.”
  4. (transitive, colloquial) to spend money on food
    comi todo o meu salário. — “I have already eaten up my entire salary.”
  5. (transitive, colloquial) to destroy, to consume
    Aquela pneumonia comeu sua saúde. — “That pneumonia has destroyed his health.”
  6. (transitive, slang) to fuck, to screw; a man having sex with someone, enjoying a role in which he penetrates his partner
    Depois do jantar, na mesma noite eu a comi. — “After dinner, that same night I had sex with her.”
  7. First-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of comer
  8. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) future subjunctive of comer
  9. First-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of comer
  10. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) personal infinitive of comer

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin comedere, present active infinitive of comedō, from com- + edō.

VerbEdit

comer (first-person singular present como, first-person singular preterite comí, past participle comido)

  1. to eat
    ¿Cómo como? ¿Cómo cómo como? ¡Como como como! (classroom example of written accent)
    How do I eat? What do you mean, how do I eat? I eat like I eat!
  2. (colloquial) to eat away, corrode
  3. (transitive, chess, board games) to capture a piece
  4. (double entendre, Mexico) to have sexual intercourse (because of similitude to coger)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

comer m (plural comeres)

  1. eating, food
    quitárselo uno de su comer
    “to deprive oneself of something for the benefit of others”
    el comer fuera es muy común
    “eating out is very common”
    ...necesario para el alma como el comer para el cuerpo
    “...necessary for the soul like food for the body”

SynonymsEdit