Last modified on 25 September 2014, at 10:58

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Apparently from a Scandinavian source; compare Norwegian slamre, Swedish slemma.

VerbEdit

slam (third-person singular simple present slams, present participle slamming, simple past and past participle slammed)

  1. (transitive, ergative) To shut with sudden force so as to produce a shock and noise.
    Don't slam the door!
  2. (transitive, ergative) To put in or on a particular place with force and loud noise. (Often followed by a preposition such as down, against or into.)
    Don't slam that trunk down on the pavement!
  3. (transitive) To strike forcefully with some implement.
    • 2011 January 18, “Wolverhampton 5 - 0 Doncaster”, BBC:
      But Wolves went in front when Steven Fletcher headed in Stephen Hunt's cross and it was 2-0 when Geoffrey Mujangi Bia slammed in his first for the club.
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To speak badly of; to criticize forcefully.
    Don't ever slam me in front of the boss like that again!
    Union leaders slammed the new proposals.
    Critics slammed the new film, calling it violent and meaningless.
  5. (basketball) To dunk forcefully, to slam dunk.
  6. (intransitive, bridge) To make a slam bid.
  7. (transitive, card games) To defeat (opponents at cards) by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hoyle to this entry?)
  8. (transitive) to change providers (e.g. of domain registration or telephone carrier) for a customer without clear (if any) consent.
  9. to drink off, to drink quickly
  10. to compete in a poetry slam
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

slam (countable and uncountable, plural slams)

  1. (countable) A sudden impact or blow.
  2. (countable) The shock and noise produced by violently closing a door or other object.
  3. (countable, basketball) A slam dunk.
  4. (countable, colloquial, US) An insult.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      “Well,” I says, “I cal'late a body could get used to Tophet if he stayed there long enough.” ¶ She flared up; the least mite of a slam at Doctor Wool was enough to set her going.
    I don't mean this as a slam, but you can be really impatient sometimes.
  5. (uncountable) The yellow iron silicate produced in alum works as a waste product.
  6. A poetry slam.
  7. (UK, dialect) The refuse of alum works.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

NounEdit

slam (plural slams)

  1. (obsolete) A type of card game, also called ruff and honours.
  2. (card games) Losing or winning all the tricks in a game.
  3. (countable, bridge) A bid of six (small slam) or seven (grand slam) in a suit or no trump.
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

slam (third-person singular simple present slams, present participle slamming, simple past and past participle slammed)

  1. (transitive, card games) To defeat by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

slam m (plural slams)

  1. poetry slam



Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slam

  1. dative of slě

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

slam (uncountable)

  1. Islam

DeclensionEdit