Last modified on 29 June 2014, at 17:25
See also: COP, çöp, and cöp

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English coppe, from Old English *coppe, as in ātorcoppe (spider, literally venom head), from Old English copp (top, summit, head), from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, round vessel, head), from Proto-Indo-European *gū- (to bend, curve). Cognate with Middle Dutch koppe, kobbe (spider). More at cobweb.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (obsolete) A spider.

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from Middle French capere (to capture), from Latin capere (to seize, to grasp); or possibly from Dutch kapen (to steal), from West Frisian kāpia (to take away), from Old Frisian kapia, to buy.

VerbEdit

cop (third-person singular simple present cops, present participle copping, simple past and past participle copped)

  1. (transitive, formerly dialect, now informal) to obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take
    • 2005, Martin Torgoff, Can't Find My Way Home, Simon & Schuster, page 10,
      Heroin appeared on the streets of our town for the first time, and Innie watched helplessly as his sixteen-year-old brother began taking the train to Harlem to cop smack.
  2. (transitive) to (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.
    When caught, he would often cop a vicious blow from his father
  3. (transitive) to steal
  4. (transitive) to adopt
    No need to cop an attitude with me, junior.
  5. (intransitive, usually with "to", slang) to admit, especially to a crime.
    I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?
    Harold copped to being known as "Dirty Harry".
    • 2005, Elmore Leonard, Mr. Paradise, page 295:
      He shot a guy in a bar on Martin Luther King Day and copped to first-degree manslaughter
TranslationsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Short for copper (police officer), itself from cop (one who cops) above, i.e. a criminal.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (slang, law enforcement) A police officer or prison guard.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Old English cop, copp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, basin, round object), from Proto-Indo-European *gu-. Cognate with Dutch kop, German Kopf.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.
  2. (obsolete) The top, summit, especially of a hill.
    • Drayton
      Cop they used to call / The tops of many hills.
  3. (obsolete) The head.
  4. A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
  5. (architecture, military) A merlon.

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan colp, from Late Latin colpus (stroke), from earlier Latin colaphus.

NounEdit

cop m (plural cops)

  1. hit, blow, strike
  2. time, occasion

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

German Zopf

NounEdit

cop m

  1. braid

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

A shortened form of copain.

PronunciationEdit

  • [kɔp]

NounEdit

cop m (plural cops)

  1. (informal) A friend, a pal.

External linksEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

cop m (oblique plural cos, nominative singular cos, nominative plural cop)

  1. Alternative form of colp.

SlovakEdit

NounEdit

cop m (nominative plural copy), declension pattern dub

  1. braid

SynonymsEdit

External linksEdit

  • cop in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk