DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ætt, átt (family, race, direction), from Proto-Germanic *aihtiz (possession, property), cognate with Old English ǣht, Old High German ēht, and Gothic 𐌰𐌹𐌷𐍄𐍃 (aihts). Derived from the verb Proto-Germanic *aiganą (to possess).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

æt c (singular definite ætten, plural indefinite ætter)

  1. (dated) family, descent
  2. (dated) class (group of persons with similar ethnic or social characteristics)

InflectionEdit


FaroeseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

æt

  1. first/second/third-person singular past of eita

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of eita (irregular)
infinitive eita
supine (h)itið
participle eitandi (h)itin
present past
first singular eiti (h)æt
second singular eitur (h)æt/(h)ætst
third singular eitur (h)æt
plural eita (h)itu
imperative
singular eit!
plural eitið!

IcelandicEdit

AdjectiveEdit

æt

  1. feminine singular indefinite nominative of ætur (edible)
  2. neuter plural indefinite nominative/accusative of ætur (edible)

VerbEdit

æt

  1. second-person singular active imperative of æta

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *āt, from Proto-Germanic *ētą. Related to etan.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ǣt m

  1. eating
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: ete, ate, æte
    • English: eat
    • Scots: ait

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *at.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

æt

  1. (+dative) at a certain place
    æt hām
    at home (with irregular apocope of dative -e)
  2. (+dative) at a certain time
    æt fruman
    in the beginning, at first
    æt þām ȳtemestan dæġe
    at the last day
  3. (+accusative, rarely) to, up to, as far as
  4. (+dative) from
    Hwā is wīs? Sē þe leornaþ æt ǣlcum menn.
    Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Greater Litany"
      Māre selþ se þearfa þām rīċan þonne hē æt him nime.
      The poor give more to the rich than they take from them.
    • 9th century, The Blickling Homilies, "Ascension Thursday"
      Hīe ġehīerdon his lāre and his word æt his selfes mūðe.
      They heard his teachings and his words from his own mouth.
DescendantsEdit

Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ætt, from Proto-Germanic *aihtiz.

NounEdit

æt f

  1. family, kin, bloodline

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit