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FaroeseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

æt

  1. first/second/third-person singular past of eita

ConjugationEdit


IcelandicEdit

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *ētą. Related to etan.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ǣt m

  1. eating

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *at

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

æt

  1. (+dative) at a certain place
    æt hām
    at home (with irregular apocope of dative -e)
  2. (+dative) at a certain time
    æt fruman
    in the beginning, at first
    æt þām ȳtemestan dæġe
    at the last day
  3. (+accusative, rarely) to, up to, as far as
  4. (+dative) from
    Æt ǣlcum be his mæġene, tō ǣlcum be his nīede.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his need.
    Hwā is wīs? Sē þe leornaþ æt ǣlcum menn.
    Who is wise? He who learns from everyone.
    • 10th century, Ælfric, "On the Greater Litany"
      Māre selþ se þearfa þām rīċan þanne hē æt him nime.
      The poor man gives more to the rich man than he takes from him.
    • 9th century, The Blickling Homilies, "Ascension Thursday"
      Hīe ġehīerdon his lāre and his word æt his selfes mūðe.
      They heard his teachings and his words from his own mouth.
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle English: æt
    • English: at

Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ætt, from Proto-Germanic *aihtiz.

NounEdit

æt f

  1. family, kin, bloodline

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit