EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

AbbreviationEdit

ed (countable and uncountable, plural eds)

  1. edition
  2. editor
  3. education (uncountable)

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

ed

  1. Education. Often used in set phrases such as phys ed, driver's ed, special ed, etc.

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin haedus. Compare Daco-Romanian ied.

NounEdit

ed

  1. kid (goat)

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

NounEdit

ed c (singular definite eden, plural indefinite eder)

  1. oath (solemn pledge)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

ed m (plural eds)

  1. eth

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony instead of e)

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et

ConjunctionEdit

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel for euphony, instead of e)
    1. Parlo italiano ed inglese. - I speak Italian and English.

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

NounEdit

ed m

  1. oath

DeclensionEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *id.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ed n

  1. it
    • circa 875, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, Ml. 17c7
      Is ed as·berat ind heretic.
      It is what the heretics say.

DescendantsEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eiðr, from Proto-Germanic *aiþaz, from Proto-Indo-European *oyt-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ed c

  1. oath

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English head.

NounEdit

ed

  1. head

VolapükEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ed

  1. and (used before a vowel)

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 21 April 2014, at 15:10