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See also: aitt, AIT, áit, áitt, -ait, and -áit

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English eyt, eit, from Old English īġeoþ, īgoþ, iggaþ, iggoþ (ait, eyot, islet, small island), diminutive of īġ, ēġ, īeġ (island). More at eyot.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

 
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Wikipedia

ait (plural aits)

  1. An island in a river, especially the River Thames in England.
    • R. Hodges (1649)
      The ait where the osiers grew.
    • 1833, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Autobiography: Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life trans. John Oxenford, book 9,
      Striking richness of vegetation which follows in the windings of the Rhine, marks its banks, islands, and aits.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch. 1,
      Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Scots ait, ate, from Middle English ate, from Old English āte. More at oat.

NounEdit

ait (plural aits)

  1. (Scotland) An oat.
    • 1785, Robbie Burns, Scotch Drink
      Let husky wheat the haughs adorn,
      An' aits set up their awnie horn,

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Finnish aitta.

NounEdit

ait

  1. barn

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /e/ or IPA(key): /ɛ/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of avoir

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish aitt (pleasant, agreeable; strange, unusual, adjective).

AdjectiveEdit

ait (genitive singular masculine ait, genitive singular feminine aite, plural aite, comparative aite)

  1. pleasant, likeable
  2. fine, excellent
  3. comical; queer
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ait m

  1. genitive singular of at

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ait n-ait hait not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "ait" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • aitt” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

āit, ait

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of āiō
  2. it is said (that)

ReferencesEdit

  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) as Homer sings (not canit): ut ait Homerus
    • (ambiguous) as Cicero says: ut ait Cicero (always in this order)

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • aït (scholarly convention)

VerbEdit

ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of aidier

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect indicative and conditional of mynd

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ait unchanged unchanged hait
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.