See also: -ait, -áit, AIT, aitt, áit, and áitt

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English eyt, eit, from Old English īġeoþ, īgoþ, iggaþ, iggoþ (ait, eyot, islet, small island), diminutive of īġ, ēġ, īeġ (island). More at eyot.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

ait (plural aits)

  1. An island in a river, especially the River Thames in England.
    • 1649, R. Hodges, unknown title:
      The ait where the osiers grew.
    • 1792, Charlotte Smith, Desmond, Broadview, published 2001, page 148:
      ‘[H]e the said seigneur, in quality of Lord Paramount, is to all intents and purposes invested with the sole right and property of the river running through his fief, together with [] all the islands and aits within it.’
    • 1833, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Autobiography: Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life trans. John Oxenford, book 9,
      Striking richness of vegetation which follows in the windings of the Rhine, marks its banks, islands, and aits.
    • 1852 March – 1853 September, Charles Dickens, chapter 1, in Bleak House, London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1853, →OCLC:
      Fog everywhere. Fog up the river, where it flows among green aits and meadows.
Synonyms
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Etymology 2

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From Scots ait, ate, from Middle English ate, from Old English āte. More at oat.

Noun

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ait (plural aits)

  1. (Scotland) An oat.
    • 1785, Robbie Burns, Scotch Drink:
      Let husky wheat the haughs adorn,
      An' aits set up their awnie horn,

Anagrams

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Crimean Tatar

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Etymology

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From Arabic عَائِد (ʕāʔid).

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: a‧it

Postposition

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ait (+ dative)

  1. concerning, relating (to)

References

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Estonian

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Estonian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia et
 
A farm granary in Ruhnu, Estonia.

Etymology

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PIE word
*h₂eǵ-

Inherited from Proto-Finnic *aitta (storehouse), probably from *ajadak (to go (in a vehicle); to drive) (with the suffix *-tta), from Proto-Finno-Ugric *aja- (to drive; to hunt, chase), borrowed from Proto-Indo-Iranian *Háȷ́ati (to drive, lead), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti (to be driving), from *h₂eǵ- (to drive).

Cognate with Finnish aitta, Ingrian aitta, Livonian āita, Ludian ait and Võro ait.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɑi̯t/, [ˈɑi̯tˑ]
  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.
  • Rhymes: -ɑit
  • Hyphenation: ait

Noun

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ait (genitive aida, partitive aita)

  1. a barn, granary, warehouse, storehouse (building for storing food and other supplies, in a farm household)
    vanaisa talust on alles ait, kelder, saun ning maakivist laudamüürid
    the barn, cellar, sauna and earthen stone board walls remain from my grandfather's farm
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!

Declension

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Declension of ait (ÕS type 22u/leib, t-d gradation)
singular plural
nominative ait aidad
accusative nom.
gen. aida
genitive aitade
partitive aita aitu
aitasid
illative aita
aidasse
aitadesse
aidusse
inessive aidas aitades
aidus
elative aidast aitadest
aidust
allative aidale aitadele
aidule
adessive aidal aitadel
aidul
ablative aidalt aitadelt
aidult
translative aidaks aitadeks
aiduks
terminative aidani aitadeni
essive aidana aitadena
abessive aidata aitadeta
comitative aidaga aitadega

References

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  • ait in Sõnaveeb (Eesti Keele Instituut)
  • ait”, in [EKSS] Eesti keele seletav sõnaraamat [Descriptive Dictionary of the Estonian Language] (in Estonian) (online version), Tallinn: Eesti Keele Sihtasutus (Estonian Language Foundation), 2009
  • ait”, in [ÕS] Eesti õigekeelsussõnaraamat ÕS 2018 [Estonian Spelling Dictionary] (in Estonian) (online version), Tallinn: Eesti Keele Sihtasutus (Estonian Language Foundation), 2018, →ISBN

French

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ɛ/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Rhymes:

Verb

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ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of avoir

Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Irish aitt (pleasant, agreeable; strange, unusual, adjective).[3]

Adjective

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ait (genitive singular masculine ait, genitive singular feminine aite, plural aite, comparative aite)

  1. pleasant, likeable
  2. fine, excellent
  3. comical; queer
Declension
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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ait m

  1. genitive singular of at

Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ait n-ait hait not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 126, page 67
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 187, page 93
  3. ^ Gregory Toner, Sharon Arbuthnot, Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, Marie-Luise Theuerkauf, Dagmar Wodtko, editors (2019), “aitt”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Further reading

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Latin

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Pronunciation

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An unambiguous poetic attestation of the two short vowels, in dactylic hexameter:

‘Quid mē / lūdis?’, a/it, ‘Quis / tē, male / sāne, iu/bēbat...? (Ovid, Amores 3.7.77)

Verb

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ait

  1. third-person singular present/perfect active indicative of aiō

References

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  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) as Homer sings (not canit): ut ait Homerus
    • (ambiguous) as Cicero says: ut ait Cicero (always in this order)

Old French

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Alternative forms

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  • aït (scholarly convention)

Verb

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ait

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of aidier

Scots

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English eten, from Old English etan, from Proto-West Germanic *etan.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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ait (third-person singular simple present aits, present participle aitin', simple past ?, past participle ?)

  1. to eat

References

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Etymology 2

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From Middle English ete, ate, æte, from Old English ǣt (food, eating), from Proto-West Germanic *āt.

Noun

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ait (plural aits)

  1. meal; food

References

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Etymology 3

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From Middle English ote, from Old English āte.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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ait (plural aits)

  1. oat
Derived terms
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References

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Etymology 4

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Compare Norwegian ætt.

Noun

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ait (plural aits)

  1. (obsolete) custom, habit

References

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Turkish

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Etymology

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Inherited from Ottoman Turkish عائد, عاید (aid, ait), from Arabic عَائِد (ʕāʔid). Compare Azerbaijani aid.

Postposition

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ait

  1. [+ dative (object)] concerning, relating (to)
    Tek bir hayatımız var ve bu hayat bize ait.
    We only have one life, and it's ours.

Further reading

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  • ait”, in Turkish dictionaries, Türk Dil Kurumu
  • Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–) “ait”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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ait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect indicative/conditional of mynd

Synonyms

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ait unchanged unchanged hait
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.