Arabic edit

Etymology edit

From the root س ب ت (s-b-t) meaning "to rest or hibernate", "to cease", "to stop or be still", "to be motionless", "to be quiet"; the religious sense likely being borrowed from the Hebrew שַׁבָּת (shabbát, weekly day of rest). Ultimately stemming from Proto-Semitic *ṯabat- (to be still, fixed, or staying), doublet of the native Arabic ثَبَتَ (ṯabata). Related to Akkadian 𒋛𒁍𒌅 (se-bu-tu /⁠sebûtu⁠/, seventh day of the month), a holiday term that is paired with Akkadian 𒌓𒌋𒐊𒄰 (UD.15.KAM /⁠šapattu, šabattu⁠/, two-week duration, the new and full moon, literally a day of the cessation).[1] Displaced شِيَار (šiyār).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

السَّبْت (as-sabtm

  1. Saturday, the cessation or last day of the week
    السَّبْتُ لَدَى ٱلْيَهُودِ يَوْمٌ مُهِمٌّ.
    as-sabtu ladā l-yahūdi yawmun muhimmun.
    Saturday is an important day for the Jews.
  2. the Sabbath
  3. the duration of a week, seven-day cycle

Declension edit

Synonyms edit

Descendants edit

  • Afar: sábti
  • Malagasy: asabotsy
  • Somali: sábti
  • Indonesian: Sabtu

See also edit

References edit

  1. ^ "The Epic of Atraḥasis" from Livius.org, © 1995–2017 adapted from B.R. Foster's translation; see especially 221 where the term appears.

Moroccan Arabic edit

Etymology edit

From Arabic السَّبْت (as-sabt).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɪs.sabt/
  • Audio:(file)

Noun edit

السبت (es-sabtm

  1. Saturday
    Synonym: يوم السبت (yūm es-sabt)

See also edit

South Levantine Arabic edit

Etymology edit

From Arabic السَّبْت (as-sabt).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /is.sabt/, [ɪsˈsab(ɪ)t]
  • Audio (Amman):(file)

Proper noun edit

السبت (is-sabtm

  1. Saturday
    Synonym: يوم السبت (yōm is-sabt)

See also edit