See also:

Korean

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Pronunciation

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Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ya
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ya
McCune–Reischauer?ya
Yale Romanization?ya

Etymology 1

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From Middle Korean 야〮 (Yale: -yá); see the main entry for more.

Particle

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(-ya)

  1. Post-vowel allomorphic form of (-a, hey, vocative particle).
    현우, 엎질렀어?Hyeonu-ya, neo-ga mul eopjilleosseo?Hyeonwoo, did you spill the water?
    나무, 이름 ?Namu-ya, neon ireum-i mwo-ni?Hey, tree, what's your name?
Usage notes
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  • For words formed by the suffix (-i), the suffix is typically deleted and the vocative takes (-a), e.g. 두꺼비 (dukkeobi, toad) > 두껍 (dukkeob-a, hey, toad).

Etymology 2

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Suffix

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(-ya)

  1. Alternative form of (-eo, intimate-style suffix), used after the copulas 이다 (-ida, to be) and 아니다 (anida, to not be).
    이게 바로 표범.Ige baro pyobeom-i-ya.This is what they call a leopard.
    ?Mwo-ya?What is it?
    아니. 없어.Ani-ya. Hal mal eopseo.It's nothing. I have nothing to say.
Usage notes
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  • Only used directly after the stems of 이다 (-ida, to be), either explicit or implicit, and its negative 아니다 (anida, to not be). If another suffix intervenes, the suffix reverts to (-eo):
    ?Mwo-yeoss-eo?What was this? (with past-marking (-eot-))
  • Before (-yo, politeness-marking particle attached to the intimate style), the form is again irregular 에요 (-eyo), and 에요 (i-eyo) contracts to 예요 (-yeyo) following a vowel.
    > 예요?Mwo-ya > mwo-yeyo?What's this? (intimate) > What's this? (polite)
  • It cannot replace (-eo) in its infinitive/connective sense. The copulas' equivalent to connective (-eo) is (-ra), although (-eo) can still be used.

Etymology 3

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From Middle Korean ᅀᅡ〮 (Yale: -zá), from Old Korean (*-sa); see the main entry for more.

Particle

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(-ya)

  1. Post-vowel allomorphic form of 이야 (-iya, emphatic particle).

See also

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