See also: IJ

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch -ie, which is borrowed from Old French -ie, from Latin -ia, from Ancient Greek -ια (-ia). Cognate with German -ei, English -y. Dutch variants are: -ie (as in theorie) and -ije (as in Turkije)[1]

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ij f (plural -ijen)

  1. -y; Forms abstract nouns denoting a state or concept related to the person(s) referred to by the stem.
  2. -ery; Forms nouns denoting a business or an organization which is run by the kind of person(s) referred to by the stem.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A. van Loey, "Schönfeld's Historische Grammatica van het Nederlands", Zutphen, 8. druk, 1970, ISBN 90-03-21170-1; § 181

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately apparently from Latin (or New Latin coinages thereof) -ia, -io, -ius, -ium, etc. In most cases likely via Latvian -ija (often pronounced /ij/) or -ijs. In some cases also possibly from High German -ei.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ij

  1. a suffix corresponding to English -ia, -y, -ion, -ius, -ium, etc.
    Austrij, analōgij, informātsij, jūlij, alumīnij – Austria, analogy, information, July (< Julius), aluminium, aluminum

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 31 March 2014, at 20:32