See also: og, Og, OG, óg, òg, o. g., 'og, and -óg

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

-o- + -g (frequentative suffix)

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-og

  1. (frequentative suffix) Added to a stem - often an onomatopoeia - to form a verb expressing a (quickly) repeating or continuous action.
    vacog (to chatter - to shut and open the mouth quickly in the cold)
    mosoly (smile)mosolyog (to smile)

Usage notesEdit

  • (frequentative suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -g is added to words ending in a vowel
    -og is added to some back-vowel words
    -ag is added to other back-vowel words
    -eg is added to unrounded front-vowel words
    -ög is added to rounded front-vowel words

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh -awc, from Proto-Brythonic *-ọg, from Proto-Celtic *-ākos, from Proto-Indo-European *-eh₂kos, *-eh₂ḱos, from a-stem suffix *-eh₂ + adjectival suffix *-kos, *-ḱos. Akin to Cornish -ek, Irish -ach, Scottish Gaelic -ach, Manx -agh, Latin -ācus, -īcus and English -y.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-og

  1. adjectival suffix often indicating an abundance of the root
    carreg (stone) + ‎-og → ‎caregog (stony)
    twll (hole) + ‎-og → ‎tyllog (porous)
    gallu (ability) + ‎-og → ‎galluog (capable)
    enw (name) + ‎-og → ‎enwog (famous)
  2. noun suffix indicating person, creature or object characterised by root
    perchen (to own) + ‎-og → ‎perchennog (owner)
    march (stallion, horse) + ‎-og → ‎marchog (knight, horserider)
    draen (thorn(s)) + ‎-og → ‎draenog (hedgehog)
    ysgyfarn (ear) + ‎-og → ‎ysgyfarnog (hare)
    clust (ear) + ‎-og → ‎clustog (cushion, bolster)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “-og”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies