EmilianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

-eg

  1. (enclitic, after a consonant) Alternative form of ge
    J-eg vān edmān.They go there tomorrow. (imperative, singular)
    J-eg dān da fêr.They give her trouble.

Related termsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

-e- +‎ -g

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-eg

  1. (frequentative suffix) Added to a stem - often an onomatopoeia - to form a verb expressing a (quickly) repeating or continuous action.
    ketyeg (to tick (like a clock))
  2. (nominal suffix) Added to a verb or a stem to form a noun or an adjective.
    töm (to stuff)tömeg (mass)
    sző (to weave)szöveg (text)
    (to shoot, to fire)löveg (cannon, gun)
    hideg (cold)

Usage notesEdit

  • (frequentative suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -g is added to words ending in a vowel
    -og is added to some back-vowel words
    -ag is added to other back-vowel words
    -eg is added to unrounded front-vowel words
    -ög is added to rounded front-vowel words
  • (nominal suffix) Harmonic variants:
    -g is added to words ending in a vowel
    -ag is added to back vowel words
    -eg is added to front vowel words

Derived termsEdit


See alsoEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German -ag, -ig, from Proto-Germanic *-agaz, *-īgaz, *-ugaz, each a variant of a common suffix *-gaz.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-eg

  1. -y, forming adjectives from nouns or verb stems

Derived termsEdit



Middle EnglishEdit

SuffixEdit

-eg

  1. Alternative form of -y.

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-eg

  1. a language, -ic, -ish
    Llydaw (Brittany) + ‎-eg → ‎Llydaweg (Breton language)
    Gwyddel (Irishman) + ‎-eg → ‎Gwyddeleg (Irish language)
    Indonesia (Indonesia) + ‎-eg → ‎Indoneseg (Indonesian language)
  2. a science, a study,-y, -ics
    peiriant (machine, engine) + ‎-eg → ‎peirianneg (engineering)
    rheswm (reason) + ‎-eg → ‎rhesymeg (logic)
    electron (electron) + ‎-eg → ‎electroneg (electronics)

Usage notesEdit

The suffix -eg is feminine but when it refers to a language, the resulting derived does not cause the soft mutation of qualifying adjectives as other feminine nouns do, especially when the adjective defines a specific or specialised kind of language.[1]

Derived termsEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Thomas, Peter Wynn, Gramadeg y Gymraeg, →ISBN, page 650
  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950-), “-eg”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies