English

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Etymology

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From Japanese さん (san).

Suffix

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-san

  1. Honorific ending used to indicate a person is Japanese or talking with Japanese, or treated like Japanese.
    • August 1, 1983, Time
      Tanaka-San’s Decline and Rise
    • December 16, 2008 , Wall Street Journal, [1]
      Barack Obama-san
    • January 31, 2009, WalletPop, [2]
      Obama-san! President's book of speeches is a huge hit in Japan
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Translations

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Anagrams

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Azerbaijani

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Verb

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preceding vowel
A / I / O / U E / Ə / İ / Ö / Ü
-san -sən

-san

  1. Form of -sən after the vowels A / I / O / U.

Irish

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Alternative forms

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  • -sean (used after palatalized consonants and front vowels)

Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-san

  1. emphatic suffix of the following persons; used after velarized consonants and back vowels
    1. third-person singular masculine
    2. third-person plural

Usage notes

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Spelled with a hyphen after -s, otherwise without a hyphen.

  • Added to nouns (or adjectives modifying a noun) in the presence of the possessive adjective to emphasize the possessor rather than the thing possessed:
    a mhadrasanhis dog
    a gcarr deargsantheir red car
  • Added to pronouns (both simple and prepositional) to add emphasis (not to create a reflexive pronoun):
    as-sanout of him
    siadsan, iadsanthey, them
  • Added to synthetic verb forms to add emphasis to the subject (third-person plural only as there are no third-person singular synthetic forms):
    chualadarsanthey heard

Derived terms

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Japanese

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Romanization

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-san

  1. Rōmaji transcription of さん

Scottish Gaelic

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Suffix

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-san

  1. -self, -selves (emphatic)

Usage notes

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Derived terms

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See also

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