EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Initialism.

NounEdit

ASMR (countable and uncountable, plural ASMRs)

  1. (countable) Initialism of age-specific mortality rate.
  2. (countable, seismology) Initialism of accelerating seismic moment release.
  3. (uncountable) Initialism of autonomous sensory meridian response (a claimed biological phenomenon involving a pleasurable tingling in response to a stimulus).
    • 2014, Joceline Andersen, “Now You’ve Got the Shiveries: Affect, Intimacy, and the ASMR Whisper Community”, in Television & New Media, volume 16, number 8:
      The ASMR community struggles with popular perception of the transgressive nature of their shared pleasure, which by its public nature is what Berlant and Warner call "nonstandard intimacy."
    • 2015 April 21, Tanis Fowler, “Relax, you may have ASMR: YouTube videos sparking pleasurable, hypnotic-like sensation result in millions of views”, in Toronto Star[1], archived from the original on 29 June 2017:
      You might say [Bob] Ross was the first ASMRtist, as those who produce ASMR videos like to be called.
    • 2015 April 26, Ben Beaumont-Thomas, quoting Holly Herndon, “Holly Herndon: the queen of tech-topia”, in The Guardian[2]:
      “The ASMR community goes against that mainstream assertion that the internet is making everybody less connected, and hurting relationships,” Herndon says. “People are making these videos at their desks, putting them online for free, and comforting strangers in this really therapeutic and sweet way.” Her own ASMR trigger is the sound of acrylic fingernails tapping on a smartphone screen.
  4. (uncountable) Content, especially audio, intended to elicit the autonomous sensory meridian response.

Derived termsEdit

  • (autonomous sensory meridian response): ASMRtist

TranslationsEdit

Proper nounEdit

ASMR

  1. American Society of Mining and Reclamation.

AnagramsEdit


IndonesianEdit

NounEdit

ASMR (first-person possessive ASMRku, second-person possessive ASMRmu, third-person possessive ASMRnya)

  1. Initialism of autonomous sensory meridian response (a claimed biological phenomenon involving a pleasurable tingling in response to a stimulus).

Further readingEdit