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See also: Mars, MARs, and marš

Contents

EnglishEdit

 Mars (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

mars

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of mar

NounEdit

mars

  1. plural of mar

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin martius.

NounEdit

mars m

  1. March

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

mars

  1. plural of mar

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

mars m (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. march
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

mars

  1. march! (military command)
    Voorwaarts, mars!
    Forward, march!

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

mars f (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. basket (usually worn on the back like a rucksack)
  2. (nautical) the platform at the top of the lower mast of a sailing ship.
Related termsEdit

FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

mars m

  1. March (month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

InterjectionEdit

mars

  1. march! (military command)



FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mars, from Latin (mensis) mārtius.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars m (plural mars)

  1. March (month)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin mārtiī, genitive singular of mārtius (relating to Mars), from Mārs (Mars, Roman god of war and agriculture).

NounEdit

mars m (invariable, no plural)

  1. March
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Danish march (march), from French marche (walk, march), of Frankish origin, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (boundary, edge).

NounEdit

mars m (genitive singular mars, nominative plural marsar)

  1. march (musical piece such as is played while marching)
  2. march (type of dance)
DeclensionEdit

Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mars

NounEdit

mars

  1. March

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Mars, borrowed from Latin Mars. So named because of its astrological association with the planet.

NounEdit

mars (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The blackish, magnetic metal susceptible to rust; iron.
    • 1475, The Book of Quintessence.
      In þat wiyn or watir ȝe quenche mars manye tymes.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

NounEdit

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mārtius.

NounEdit

mars m (oblique plural mars, nominative singular mars, nominative plural mars)

  1. March (month)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

see marc

NounEdit

mars m

  1. oblique plural of marc
  2. nominative singular of marc

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) marz

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (of March).

Proper nounEdit

mars m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) March

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars c

  1. March (month)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


TashelhitEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius.

NounEdit

mars

  1. March (month)