See also: Mars, MARS, mârs, marš, Марс, and марс

EnglishEdit

 Mars (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mars

  1. Third-person singular simple present indicative form of mar

NounEdit

mars

  1. plural of mar

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed through Vulgar Latin from Latin martius.

NounEdit

mars m

  1. March

Atong (India)Edit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English March.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars (Bengali script মার্স)

  1. March

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


AzerbaijaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian مارس(mârs).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars (definite accusative marsı, plural marslar)

  1. (backgammon) gammon (a game in which one player removes all his checkers before his opponent can remove any, and counted as a double win)
    Marsdan qaçan oyunu aparar!
    One who [manages to] escape the gammon will win the game!

DeclensionEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

mars

  1. plural of mar

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

mars m (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. march
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Indonesian: mars
  • Papiamentu: mars

InterjectionEdit

mars

  1. march! (military command)
    Voorwaarts, mars!Forward, march!

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

mars f (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. basket (usually worn on the back like a rucksack)
  2. (nautical) the platform at the top of the lower mast of a sailing ship.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

mars f (plural marsen, diminutive marsje n)

  1. (Suriname, vulgar) ass, arse
    • 2018, Killer Kamal (lyrics and music), “Natuur”:
      Ik tjap die beats als marsepein / verkracht die beats anaal, doe hun marsen pijn
      I devour beats like marzipan / rape beats anally, hurt their anuses
    • 2020 September 9, Rasit Elibol, “‘Laat ze me mars eten’ ['Let them kiss my ass']”, in De Groene Amsterdammer[1], retrieved 30 July 2021:
      ‘Eerst hebben ze ons geleerd dat het slecht was om je eigen taal te spreken! Dan nu aksepteren zij als eerste diezelfde taalinvloeden! Laat ze me mars eten.’
      'First they taught us that it was bad to speak your own language! Yet now they are the first to accept the same linguistic influences! Let them kiss my ass.'

FaroeseEdit

NounEdit

mars m

  1. March (month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from German marsch!, French marche!, or less likely, an irregular imperative form of marssia (compare seis < seistä).

InterjectionEdit

mars!

  1. march! (military command)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mars, from Latin (mensis) mārtius.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars m (plural mars)

  1. March (month)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

 
Icelandic Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia is

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin mārtiī, genitive singular of mārtius (relating to Mars), from Mārs (Mars, Roman god of war and agriculture).

NounEdit

mars m (invariable, no plural)

  1. March
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Danish march (march), from French marche (walk, march), of Frankish origin, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (boundary, edge).

NounEdit

mars m (genitive singular mars, nominative plural marsar)

  1. march (musical piece such as is played while marching)
  2. march (type of dance)
DeclensionEdit

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch mars, from Middle French marcher (to march, walk), from Old French marchier (to stride, to march, to trample), from Frankish *markōn (to mark, mark out, to press with the foot), from Proto-Germanic *markōną (area, region, edge, rim, border), akin to Persian مرز(marz), from Proto-Indo-European *merǵ- (edge, boundary).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmars]
  • Hyphenation: mars

NounEdit

mars (plural mars-mars, first-person possessive marsku, second-person possessive marsmu, third-person possessive marsnya)

  1. march:
    1. a formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies.
    2. any song in the genre of music written for marching.

Further readingEdit


Mauritian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mars

NounEdit

mars

  1. March

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Mars, borrowed from Latin Mars. So named because of its astrological association with the planet.

NounEdit

mars (uncountable)

  1. (rare) The blackish, magnetic metal susceptible to rust; iron.
    • 1475, The Book of Quintessence.
      In þat wiyn or watir ȝe quenche mars manye tymes.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month of the Gregorian calendar)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (month of the god Mars).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars m (indeclinable)

  1. March (third month)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mārtius.

NounEdit

mars m (oblique plural mars, nominative singular mars, nominative plural mars)

  1. March (month)
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

see marc

NounEdit

mars m

  1. oblique plural of marc
  2. nominative singular of marc

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sutsilvan, Puter, Vallader) marz

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mārtius (of March).

Proper nounEdit

mars m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran) March

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mars c

  1. March (month)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit