Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Stimulus

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Latin stimulus (goad, prick)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stimulus (plural stimuli)

  1. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Any external phenomenon that has an influence on a system, by triggering or modifying an internal phenomenon.
    an economic stimulus
    • 2012 November 7, Matt Bai, “Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds”, in New York Times[1]:
      Democrats, meanwhile, point out that Republicans seem to have made a conscious decision, beginning with the stimulus, to oppose anything the president put forward, dooming any chance of renewed cooperation between the parties.
  2. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (physiology) Something external that elicits or influences a physiological or psychological activity or response.
  3. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) (psychology) Anything effectively impinging upon any of the sensory apparatuses of a living organism, including physical phenomena both internal and external to the body.
  4. (Can we clean up(+) this sense?) Anything that induces a person to take action.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

EsperantoEdit

VerbEdit

stimulus

  1. conditional of stimuli

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin stimulus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stimulus m (plural stimulus or stimuli)

  1. stimulus

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *steyǵ- (to pierce, prick, be sharp). Cognate with Ancient Greek στίζω (stízō, I mark).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stimulus m (genitive stimulī); second declension

  1. a goad, prick
  2. a sting
  3. (figuratively) stimulus, incentive

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative stimulus stimulī
genitive stimulī stimulōrum
dative stimulō stimulīs
accusative stimulum stimulōs
ablative stimulō stimulīs
vocative stimule stimulī

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • stimulus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • stimulus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • stimulus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • stimulus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to be spurred on by ambition: stimulis gloriae concitari
    • to spur, urge a person on: calcaria alicui adhibere, admovere; stimulos alicui admovere
  • stimulus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin

NounEdit

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli, definite plural stimuliene)

  1. a stimulus

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin

NounEdit

stimulus m (definite singular stimulusen, indefinite plural stimuli or stimulusar, definite plural stimuliane or stimulusane)

  1. a stimulus

ReferencesEdit