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EweEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Februar

  1. February

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeːbruaːr/, [ˈfeː.bʁu.aːɐ̯] (standard)
  • IPA(key): [ˈfeː.bʁʊɐ̯] (casual speech)
  • (file)

NounEdit

Februar m (genitive Februars or Februar, plural Februare)

  1. February

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • (February): Hornung (archaic or poetic)

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Februar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfeːbʀuˌaː(ʀ)/, [ˈfeːbʀuˌaː(χ)]

Proper nounEdit

Februar

  1. February

See alsoEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English Februarie, februari, februare, from Latin Februārius (the month of the Februa), from Fēbrua (the Purgings, the Purifications), a Roman holiday two days after its ides (i.e., Feb. 15), + -arius (-ary: forming adjectives). Fēbrua from fēbruum (purging), from an earlier Sabine [Term?] word, possibly from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (smoke, haze) and thus cognate with thio- (sulfurous) and Ancient Greek θεῖον (theîon, sulfur) or from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰris, an extension of the root *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn) and thus cognate with fever and febris. A relatinization abandoning Middle English feoverel, from Old French feverier.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Februar

  1. February

See alsoEdit