English edit

 
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Sangleys, as described in 1590 in the Boxer Codex

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Spanish Sangley, ultimately from Hokkien, possibly from:

  • (siâng lâi, literally frequently comes), as labeled in the Boxer Codex (1590), from which Mandarin 常來人常来人 (chángláirén) referring to Sangleys originates and consistent with Francisco de Sande (1576)'s description of Throughout these islands they call the Chinese 'Sangleyes', meaning 'a people who come and go,' on account of their habit of coming annually to these islands to trade, or, as they say there, 'the regular port'. as per Manuel (1948)
  • 生理 (seng-lí, business; livelihood, IPA: /ɕiɪŋ³³ li⁵⁵⁴/) as in 生理人 (seng-lí-lâng, merchant; tradesman; trafficker), according to Go (2014-2015) and Manuel (1948) as sieng-lí recorded in Piñol (1937)
  • 商旅 (siang-lí, travelling merchant), according to Manuel (1948) & Hofileña (2011), which Go (2014-2015) considers to be "a rather literal term uncommon among early Chinese in the Philippines".
  • (sàng lâi, literally sent over) or 生理人生理人 (seng-lí-lâng lâi, literally businessman comes), according to Chan-Yap (1980).
  • (siâng lâi / sâng lâi, literally who comes), as per Norberto Romualdez in Manuel (1948) who says that sangley is a Spanish corruption of sang lay, signifying "who comes", an expression used by the Chinese in the Islands to greet a ship coming from China.

Noun edit

Sangley (plural Sangleys or Sangleyes)

  1. (Philippines, historical) person of pure Chinese ancestry (especially during the Spanish colonial period in the Philippines)
    • 1905, United States Bureau of the Census, Census of the Philippine Islands, 1903, page 483:
      There were also in this city certain Sangleyes who had settled down there to sell their merchandise, so that they remained there from one year to another.
    • 1907, Emma Helen Blair, The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, →ISBN, page 136:
      They retired to the river of Tan-Chuy, with a prize which they made there, a small champan from China, which came from that kingdom to Hermosa Island to carry supplies and merchandise; in it was traveling a religious of St. Dominic, in the garb of a Sangley.
    • 1947, Edwin Wolf, Doctrina Christiana: the First Book Printed in the Philippines, Manila, 1593, →ISBN:
      What arouses my wonder most is, that when I arrived no Sangley knew how to paint anything; but now they have so perfected themselves in this art that they have produced marvelous works with both the brush and the chisel....

Anagrams edit

Spanish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Hokkien, possibly from:

  • (siâng lâi, literally frequently comes), as labeled in the Boxer Codex (1590), from which Mandarin 常來人常来人 (chángláirén) referring to Sangleys originates and consistent with Francisco de Sande (1576)'s description of Throughout these islands they call the Chinese 'Sangleyes', meaning 'a people who come and go,' on account of their habit of coming annually to these islands to trade, or, as they say there, 'the regular port'. as per Manuel (1948)
  • 生理 (seng-lí, business; livelihood, IPA: /ɕiɪŋ³³ li⁵⁵⁴/) as in 生理人 (seng-lí-lâng, merchant; tradesman; trafficker), according to Go (2014-2015) and Manuel (1948) as "sieng-lí" recorded in Piñol (1937)
  • 商旅 (siang-lí, travelling merchant), according to Manuel (1948) & Hofileña (2011), which Go (2014-2015) considers to be "a rather literal term uncommon among early Chinese in the Philippines".
  • (sàng lâi, literally sent over) or 生理人生理人 (seng-lí-lâng lâi, literally businessman comes), according to Chan-Yap (1980).
  • (siâng lâi / sâng lâi, literally who comes), as per Norberto Romualdez in Manuel (1948) who says that sangley is a Spanish corruption of sang lay, signifying "who comes", an expression used by the Chinese in the Islands to greet a ship coming from China.

According to Quilis et al. (1997), Wenceslao Retana (1921) commented before (sic):[1]

"(del chino xiang-lay, mercader.) adj. Nombre que en lo antiguo se dio en Filipinas a los mercaderes chinos, y que luego se hizo genérico de los de esta raza residentes en aquellas islas"

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sanˈɡlei/ [sãŋˈɡlei̯]
  • Rhymes: -ei
  • Syllabification: San‧gley

Noun edit

Sangley m (plural Sangleyes)

  1. (Philippines, historical) person of pure Chinese ancestry (especially during the Spanish colonial period in the Philippines)

References edit

  1. ^ Quilis, Antonio, Casado-Fresnillo, Celia, Quilis-Sanz, María José (1997) Los filipinismos y otras palabras de Filipinas contenidas en el «Diccionario» de la Academia[1], Boletín de la Real Academia Española, page 45

Tagalog edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Spanish Sangley, ultimately from Hokkien, possibly from:

  • (siâng lâi, literally frequently comes), as labeled in the Boxer Codex (1590), from which Mandarin 常來人常来人 (chángláirén) referring to Sangleys originates and consistent with Francisco de Sande (1576)'s description of Throughout these islands they call the Chinese 'Sangleyes', meaning 'a people who come and go,' on account of their habit of coming annually to these islands to trade, or, as they say there, 'the regular port'. as per Manuel (1948)[1]
  • 生理 (seng-lí, business; livelihood, IPA: /ɕiɪŋ³³ li⁵⁵⁴/) as in 生理人 (seng-lí-lâng, merchant; tradesman; trafficker), according to Go (2014-2015)[2] and Manuel (1948)[1] as sieng-lí recorded in Piñol (1937)
  • 商旅 (siang-lí, travelling merchant), according to Manuel (1948)[1] & Hofileña (2011),[3] which Go (2014-2015) considers to be "a rather literal term uncommon among early Chinese in the Philippines".
  • (sàng lâi, literally sent over) or 生理人生理人 (seng-lí-lâng lâi, literally businessman comes), according to Chan-Yap (1980). [4]
  • (siâng lâi / sâng lâi, literally who comes), as per Norberto Romualdez in Manuel (1948) who says that sangley is a Spanish corruption of sang lay, signifying "who comes", an expression used by the Chinese in the Islands to greet a ship coming from China.[1]

Doublet of Sanglay.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

Sangléy (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜅ᜔ᜎᜒᜌ᜔)

  1. (historical) person of pure Chinese ancestry (especially during the Spanish colonial period in the Philippines)
  2. Alternative form of Sanglay

See also edit

References edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Manuel, E. Arsenio (1948) Chinese elements in the Tagalog language: with some indication of Chinese influence on other Philippine languages and cultures and an excursion into Austronesian linguistics[2], Manila: Filipiniana Publications, pages 50-51
  2. ^ Go, Bon Juan (December 23, 2014 – January 19, 2015) “Gems of History: Sangley”, in Tulay Fortnightly: Chinese-Filipino Digest, volume XXVII, number 14, Manila: Kaisa Para Sa Kaunlaran, Inc., →ISSN, pages 5-6
  3. ^ Hofileña, Saul (2011) “Sangley Point and the former U.S. Navy Yard in Cavite City”, in Under the Stacks, Manila, →ISBN
  4. ^ Chan-Yap, Gloria (1980) “Hokkien Chinese borrowings in Tagalog”, in Pacific Linguistics, volume B, number 71 (PDF), Canberra, A.C.T. 2600.: The Australian National University, page 132