abominable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English abhomynable, from Old French abominable, from Late Latin abōminābilis (deserving abhorrence), from abōminor (abhor, deprecate as an ill omen), from ab (from, away from) + ōminor (forebode, predict, presage), from ōmen (sign, token, omen). Formerly erroneously folk-etymologized as deriving from Latin ab- + homo and therefore spelled abhominable, abhominal; see those entries for more.

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /əˈbɑm.ə.nə.bl̩/, /əˈbɑm.nə.bl̩/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ɘˈbɔm.ɘ.nɘ.bɯ/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

abominable (comparative more abominable, superlative most abominable)

  1. Worthy of, or causing, abhorrence, as a thing of evil omen; odious in the utmost degree; very hateful; detestable; loathsome; execrable. [first attested around 1150 to 1350][1]
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], OCLC 964384981, Revelation 21:8, column 1:
      But the feareful, and vnbeleeuing, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and ſorcerers, and idolaters, and all lyars, ſhall haue their part in the lake which burneth with fire and brimſtone: which is the ſecond death.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      The parish stank of idolatry, abominable rites were practiced in secret, and in all the bounds there was no one had a more evil name for the black traffic than one Alison Sempill, who bode at the Skerburnfoot.
  2. (obsolete) Excessive, large (used as an intensifier).
  3. Very bad or inferior.
  4. Disagreeable or unpleasant. [First attested in the late 19th century.][1]
    • 2017 July 8, Zoe Williams, “Fit in my 40s: 'The brute fact is, something must be done'”, in The Guardian[1]:
      I want to go faster on my bike than a person with a beard. I want to be the first to own whatever’s the next spiraliser. I want it all: a carapace of insouciance over rock-hard triceps.
      This is an abominable thing to want, vain in every sense. But I’m going to set out to do whatever it takes not to decay faster than other people, and report it accurately and fairly.

Usage notesEdit

  • Nouns to which "abominable" is often applied: man, woman, crime, act, deed, sin, vice, character, place, mystery, treatment, church, bride, snowman.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Norwegian Bokmål: abominabel

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “abominable”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 6.

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abominable (masculine and feminine plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Learned borrowing from Late Latin abōminābilis (abominable, detestable).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. Absolutely loathsome; abominable.
  2. Exceedingly bad or ugly; abominable.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

abominable m or f (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

abominable

  1. Alternative form of abhomynable

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /abɔmɪˈnɑːblə/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːblə
  • Hyphenation: a‧bo‧mi‧na‧ble

AdjectiveEdit

abominable

  1. definite singular of abominabel
  2. plural of abominabel

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin abōminābilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /abomiˈnable/, [a.β̞o.miˈna.β̞le]

AdjectiveEdit

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit