See also: Omen, òmen, and ōmen

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ōmen (foreboding, omen).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈəʊmən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈoʊmən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -əʊmən

NounEdit

omen (plural omens)

 
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  1. Something which portends or is perceived to portend either a good or evil event or circumstance in the future, or which causes a foreboding; a portent or augury.
    the ghost's appearance was an ill omen
    a rise in imports might be an omen of economic recovery
    the egg has, during the span of history, represented mystery, magic, medicine, food and omen
    • 1856, Gustave Flaubert, chapter 10, in Madame Bovary, Part 3:
      Day broke. He saw three black hens asleep in a tree. He shuddered, horrified at this omen. Then he promised the Holy Virgin three chasubles for the church, and that he would go barefooted from the cemetery at Bertaux to the chapel of Vassonville.
  2. A thing of prophetic significance.
    a sign of ill omen

Usage notesEdit

  • Adjectives often applied to "omen": good, ill, bad, auspicious, evil, favorable, happy, lucky. The terms for a positive omen aren't used much negatively, and it's considered oxymoronic by some to use it positively.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

omen (third-person singular simple present omens, present participle omening, simple past and past participle omened)

  1. (transitive) To be an omen of.
  2. (intransitive) To divine or predict from omens.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Latin osmen, of uncertain ultimate origin. Ancient authors derived it from ōs (mouth). Recently it was by some referred to Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew- (to see, perceive) (whence audiō)[1] or to the source of Ancient Greek οἴομαι (oíomai, I think, believe, suppose)[2].

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōmen n (genitive ōminis); third declension

  1. An object or occurrence believed to portend or predict a future event, circumstance, situation, or state of affairs: an omen, a sign, a harbinger, a portent, a token
    Synonym: ōrāculum
    • 45 BCE, Marcus Tullius Cicero, De Divinatione ; 1.46.103:
      Atque ego exempla ominum nota proferam: L. Paulus consuliterum, cum ei bellum ut cum rege Perse gereret obtigisset, ut ea ipsa die domum ad vesperum rediit, filiolam suam Tertiam, quae tum erat admodum parva, osculans animum advertit tristiculam. 'Quid est', inquit, 'mea Tertia? quid tristis es?' 'Mi pater', inquit, 'Persa periit.' Tum ille artius puellam conplexus: 'Accipio', inquit, 'mea filia, omen. Erat autem mortuus catellus eo nomine. L. Flaccum, flaminem Martialem, ego audivi, cum diceret Caeciliam Metelli, cum vellet sororis suae filiam in matrimonium conlocare, exisse in quoddam sacellum ominis capiendi causa, quod fieri more veterum solebat. Cum virgo staret et Caecilia in sella sederet neque diu ulla vox exstitisset, puellam defatigatam petisse a matertera, ut sibi concederet, paulisper ut in eius sella requiesceret; illam autem dixisse: 'Vero, mea puella, tibi concedo meas sedes.' Quod omen res consecuta est; ipsa enim brevi mortua est, virgo autem nupsit, cui Caecilia nupta fuerat. Haec posse contemni vel etiam rideri praeclare intellego, sed id ipsum est deos non putare, quae ab iis significantur, contemnere.
      Now let me give some well-known examples of omens: When Lucius Paulus was consul the second time, and had been chosen to wage war against King Perses, upon returning home on the evening of the day on which he had been appointed, he noticed, as he kissed his little daughter Tertia (at that time a very small child), that she was rather sad. 'What is the matter, Tertia, my dear? Why are you sad?' 'Oh! father, Persa is dead.' Paulus clasped the child in a closer embrace and said, 'Daughter, I accept that as an sign. Now, 'Persa' was the name of a little puppy that had died. I heard Lucius Flaccus,​ the high priest of Mars, relate the following story: Metellus' daughter, Caecilia, who was desirous of arranging a marriage for her sister's daughter, went, according to the ancient custom, to a small chapel to receive an omen. A long time passed while the maiden stood and Caecilia was seated on a chair without any word being spoken. Finally, the former grew weary and said to her aunt: 'Let me sit awhile on your chair.' 'Certainly, my child,' said Caecilia, 'you may have my place.' And this was a sign of what came to pass, for in a short time Caecilia died and the girl married her aunt's husband. I realize perfectly well that these omens may be lightly regarded and even be laughed at, but to make light of signs sent by the gods is nothing less than to disbelieve in the existence of the gods.
    • ~101 CE, Decimus Junius Juvenalis, Saturae ; Satura 4, lines 123-125:
      non cedit Veiiento, sed ut fanaticus oestro / percussus, Bellona, tuo diuinat et "ingens / omen habes" inquit "magni clarique triumphi..."
      Veiientus yields not, but as one inspired by the maddening / influence of the goddess Bellona, prophesies. "A mighty / token this you possess" he says "of some great and illustrious triumph..."

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ōmen ōmina
Genitive ōminis ōminum
Dative ōminī ōminibus
Accusative ōmen ōmina
Ablative ōmine ōminibus
Vocative ōmen ōmina

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: omen
  • English: omen
  • German: Omen
  • Norwegian:
    • Norwegian Bokmål: omen
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: omen

ReferencesEdit

  • omen in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • omen in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • omen in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • omen in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to wish prosperity to an undertaking: aliquid optimis ominibus prosequi (vid. sect. VI. 11., note Prosequi...)
    • and may heaven avert the omen! heaven preserve us from this: quod di immortales omen avertant! (Phil. 44. 11)
    • to accept as a happy omen: omen accipere (opp. improbare)
    • to interpret something as an omen: accipere, vertere aliquid in omen
    • with favourable omens: faustis ominibus
    • an evil omen; presage of ill: omen infaustum, triste
  • omen in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  1. ^ John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “omen”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.
  2. ^ Watkins, Calvert (1985) The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots, Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin omen

NounEdit

omen n (definite singular omenet, indefinite plural omen or omener or omina, definite plural omena or omenene or ominaene)

  1. an omen

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin omen.

NounEdit

omen n (definite singular omenet, indefinite plural omen, definite plural omena)

  1. an omen

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

omen m

  1. definite singular of om

ReferencesEdit


Old PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

omen m

  1. Alternative form of ome