See also: HOMO, Homo, and homo-

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈhəʊ.məʊ/, /ˈhɒm.əʊ/
  • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhoʊ.moʊ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊməʊ

Etymology 1 edit

Clipping of homosexual.

Noun edit

homo (plural homos)

  1. (colloquial, often derogatory) Clipping of homosexual.
    • 1938, Cecil Day Lewis, Starting point[1], page 127:
      "... He's a homo."
      "My dear Theo, at my age one can't worry about little details like that. Besides, he's got such a nice voice."
    I heard that he's a homo, but he hasn't come out of the closet yet.
Translations edit

Adjective edit

homo (comparative more homo, superlative most homo)

  1. (colloquial, sometimes derogatory) Of or pertaining to homosexuality.

Etymology 2 edit

Clipping of homogenized.

Noun edit

homo (countable and uncountable, plural homos)

  1. (dated, US, Canada) Homogenized milk with a high butterfat content.
    • 1956, Purdue University. Agricultural Experiment Station., Station bulletin[2], page 25:
      One quart of homo wholesale in glass equals one quart equivalent. Certain modifications were made in these relatives to adjust for variations in units per ...
Translations edit

Adjective edit

homo (not comparable)

  1. (Canada, US) Homogenized; almost always said of milk with a high butterfat content.
    • 1958, American milk review and milk plant monthly[3], volume 20, page 190:
      Regular homo milk was being sold out of stores in half gallons for 33 cents against 44 cents on regular homo milk on home delivery.

Etymology 3 edit

From Latin homō̆ (man, human), sometimes as a shortening of Homo sapiens. (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?) Doublet of hombre, ombre, and gome.

Noun edit

homo (plural homos)

  1. (nonstandard) A human.
    • 1850, Edgar Allan Poe, X-ing a Paragrab:
      John, John, if you don't go you're no homo—no! You're only a fowl, an owl, a cow, a sow,—a doll, a poll; a poor, old, good-for-nothing-to-nobody, log, dog, hog, or frog, come out of a Concord bog.
See also edit
References edit
  • John Camden Hotten (1873) The Slang Dictionary

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Bongo edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homo

  1. nose

References edit

  • Moi, Daniel Rabbi and Mario Lau Babur Kuduku, Sister Mary Mangira Michael, Simon Hagimir John, Rapheal Zakenia Paul Mafoi, Nyoul Gulluma Kuduku. 2018. Bongo – English Dictionary. Juba, South Sudan. SIL-South Sudan.

Chickasaw edit

Etymology edit

From the same root as holmo (v1.), which is related to Choctaw holmo (roof).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

homo

  1. (active voice, transitive, nominal object) to roof, to put a roof on

Inflection edit

Derived terms edit

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin homo.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homo n (indeclinable)

  1. genus Homo, especially in informal and creative use
    Synonym: člověk
    • 1985, Listy:
      Tak sebou hni, ty moje malý homo sapiens! [...] můj malý homo!
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 2008, Jekaterina Andrikanis, Homevideo I. - aneb Sám sobě režisérem:
      Zapnutím kamery vstoupil „homo natáčející“ do dialogu s „homo prohlížejícím“.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Usage notes edit

  • Specialists usually use the capitalized translingual spelling Homo.

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • homo in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • homo in Akademický slovník cizích slov, 1995, at prirucka.ujc.cas.cz

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of homoseksueel or Clipping of homofiel.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɦoː.moː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ho‧mo

Noun edit

homo m (plural homo's, diminutive homootje n)

  1. (neutral, not offensive) gay, homosexual
  2. (offensive, derogatory) Used as a general slur.

Usage notes edit

The word homo is a general, neutral and somewhat informal term for a homosexual person. It is used as a slur by some, but the term, or its use in this way, can be considered offensive. Because the word itself is not inherently offensive or vulgar, some people may take offense at the implication that homosexuality is something negative and shameful that could be used as a derogatory term. This depends, of course, on a particular person's attitude towards homosexuality. Compare similar usage of English gay.

Derived terms edit

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From Latin homō. Compare French homme, Italian uomo. Doublet of oni.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homo (accusative singular homon, plural homoj, accusative plural homojn)

  1. a human being, person
    • 1933, La Sankta Biblio, (Evangelio laŭ Luko 4:4):
      Kaj Jesuo respondis al li: Estas skribite, Ne per la pano sole vivos homo.
      Then Jesus answered him, "It is written, "Man shall not live by bread alone." (Luke 4:4)

Hypernyms edit

Hyponyms edit

Holonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Ido: homo

See also edit

homo

Finnish edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of homoseksuaali.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhomo/, [ˈho̞mo̞]
  • Rhymes: -omo
  • Syllabification(key): ho‧mo

Noun edit

homo

  1. gay man
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:homo
  2. (rare) any gay person
  3. (offensive, derogatory) Used as a general slur.

Usage notes edit

The word homo is a general, neutral and somewhat informal term for a homosexual person. It is used as a slur by some, but either the term, or its use in this way, can be considered offensive. Because the word itself is not inherently offensive or vulgar, some people may take offense at the implication that homosexuality is something negative and shameful that could be used as a derogatory term. This depends, of course, on a particular person's attitude towards homosexuality. Compare similar usage in Dutch.

Declension edit

Inflection of homo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
nominative homo homot
genitive homon homojen
partitive homoa homoja
illative homoon homoihin
singular plural
nominative homo homot
accusative nom. homo homot
gen. homon
genitive homon homojen
partitive homoa homoja
inessive homossa homoissa
elative homosta homoista
illative homoon homoihin
adessive homolla homoilla
ablative homolta homoilta
allative homolle homoille
essive homona homoina
translative homoksi homoiksi
abessive homotta homoitta
instructive homoin
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of homo (Kotus type 1/valo, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative homoni homoni
accusative nom. homoni homoni
gen. homoni
genitive homoni homojeni
partitive homoani homojani
inessive homossani homoissani
elative homostani homoistani
illative homooni homoihini
adessive homollani homoillani
ablative homoltani homoiltani
allative homolleni homoilleni
essive homonani homoinani
translative homokseni homoikseni
abessive homottani homoittani
instructive
comitative homoineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative homosi homosi
accusative nom. homosi homosi
gen. homosi
genitive homosi homojesi
partitive homoasi homojasi
inessive homossasi homoissasi
elative homostasi homoistasi
illative homoosi homoihisi
adessive homollasi homoillasi
ablative homoltasi homoiltasi
allative homollesi homoillesi
essive homonasi homoinasi
translative homoksesi homoiksesi
abessive homottasi homoittasi
instructive
comitative homoinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative homomme homomme
accusative nom. homomme homomme
gen. homomme
genitive homomme homojemme
partitive homoamme homojamme
inessive homossamme homoissamme
elative homostamme homoistamme
illative homoomme homoihimme
adessive homollamme homoillamme
ablative homoltamme homoiltamme
allative homollemme homoillemme
essive homonamme homoinamme
translative homoksemme homoiksemme
abessive homottamme homoittamme
instructive
comitative homoinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative homonne homonne
accusative nom. homonne homonne
gen. homonne
genitive homonne homojenne
partitive homoanne homojanne
inessive homossanne homoissanne
elative homostanne homoistanne
illative homoonne homoihinne
adessive homollanne homoillanne
ablative homoltanne homoiltanne
allative homollenne homoillenne
essive homonanne homoinanne
translative homoksenne homoiksenne
abessive homottanne homoittanne
instructive
comitative homoinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative homonsa homonsa
accusative nom. homonsa homonsa
gen. homonsa
genitive homonsa homojensa
partitive homoaan
homoansa
homojaan
homojansa
inessive homossaan
homossansa
homoissaan
homoissansa
elative homostaan
homostansa
homoistaan
homoistansa
illative homoonsa homoihinsa
adessive homollaan
homollansa
homoillaan
homoillansa
ablative homoltaan
homoltansa
homoiltaan
homoiltansa
allative homolleen
homollensa
homoilleen
homoillensa
essive homonaan
homonansa
homoinaan
homoinansa
translative homokseen
homoksensa
homoikseen
homoiksensa
abessive homottaan
homottansa
homoittaan
homoittansa
instructive
comitative homoineen
homoinensa

Derived terms edit

Compounds edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Franco-Provençal edit

Etymology edit

From Latin hominem.

Pronunciation edit

  • (Savoyard dialect) IPA(key): /ˈomo/
  • (Bressan dialect) IPA(key): /ˈumu/

Noun edit

homo m (plural homens)

  1. man
    Coordinate term: femna

Further reading edit

  • homo in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca

French edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of homosexuel.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homo m or f by sense (plural homos)

  1. gay (homosexual person, especially male)

Adjective edit

homo (plural homos)

  1. gay, homo

Further reading edit

Ido edit

Etymology edit

From Esperanto homo, from English human, French homme and humain, Italian uomo, Spanish hombre, from Latin homō, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰǵʰm̥mō (earthling).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homo (plural homi)

  1. human, man

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Indonesian edit

Etymology edit

From English homo.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ho.mo/
  • Hyphenation: ho‧mo

Noun edit

homo (first-person possessive homoku, second-person possessive homomu, third-person possessive homonya)

  1. (colloquial, offensive) gay; homosexual

Synonyms edit

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔ.mo/
  • Rhymes: -ɔmo
  • Hyphenation: hò‧mo

Noun edit

homo m (plural homini)

  1. (obsolete) Obsolete spelling of omo
    1. man, person
      • c. 1226, Francis of Assisi, Cantico delle creature [Canticle of the Creatures]‎[5], page 2:
        Laudato si misignore per sora nostra morte corporale, da la quale nullu homo vivente poskappare
        Praised be you, my Lord, through our sister Bodily Death, from which no living person can escape.
      • 1314, Dante Alighieri, “Canto I”, in Inferno[6], lines 64–66; republished as Giorgio Petrocchi, editor, La Commedia secondo l'antica vulgata[7], 2nd revised edition, Florence: Casa Editrice Le Lettere, 1994:
        Quando viddi custui nel gran diserto
        Miserere di me gridai ad lui
        qual che tu sii o ombra o homo certo
        When I saw him in the vast desert, I cried unto him "Have pity on me, whichever you are, or shadow or real man!"

Latin edit

 
duo hominēs (two people)

Etymology edit

From earlier hemō, from Proto-Italic *hemō, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰm̥mṓ (earthling), from *dʰéǵʰōm (earth), whence Latin humus. Cognates include Old Lithuanian žmuõ (man), Gothic 𐌲𐌿𐌼𐌰 (guma) and Old English guma (man). See also nēmō (no one), from *ne hemō.

The phenomenon of a derivational relationship between the words for both earth and man is also seen in Semitic languages: Hebrew ⁧אָדָם(adám, man), ⁧אֲדָמָה(adamá, soil).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

homō m (genitive hominis); third declension

  1. a human being, man, human, person
    Homō hominī lupus (proverb).
    Man is a wolf to man.
    Hominēs, dum docent, discunt.
    While teaching, people also learn themselves.
    • 163 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Heauton Timorumenos [The Self-Tormentor]:
      Homŏ sum, hūmānī nihil ā mĕ aliēnum putō.
      I'm a human being, and nothing that's human is alien to me.
    • 67 or 49 BC, Fragmentum Atestinum :researchgate.com
      qvod·ad·hominem·libervm·liberamve·pertinere·deicatvr
    • 66 BCE, Cicero, Pro Cluentio 199:
      At quae māter! [] cuius ea stultitia est, ut eam nēmō hominem appellāre possit!
      And what a mother! [] whose stupidity is such that nobody would even call her human!
    • ?, Pseudo-Remmius Palaemon, Ars 536.9:
      [] exceptīs paucīs masculīnī generis, quōrum numerō sunt ōrdo, ligō, et iis quae commūnis generis sunt, ut homō, nēmō, būbō et mangō.
      [] except [] and those that are of common gender, such as homō, nēmō, būbō and mangō.
  2. a male human being, man
    • Paulus, Digesta Iustiniani 48.19.38.5.3:
      Quī abortiōnis aut amātōris pōculum dant [] sī eō mulier aut homō perierit []
      Those who poison someone with an abortion or love potion [] if it causes the death of the woman or man []
  3. (address) man, fellow, mate, pal, bud, partner, dude (a form of address to male peers, especially by another male)
    • 160 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, Adelphoe 111, (Robert Kauer and W. M. Lindsay (eds), 1958):
      prō Iuppiter, tŭ homō adigi' mĕ ad īnsāniam!
      For Jupiter's sake, man, you're driving me insane!
  4. (address) used in the vocative expression "mi homo" as a form of address to a man by a woman
  5. (Medieval Latin) husband

Usage notes edit

  • Homō has the basic sense of "human being"[1] and is often used generically to mean “Man” or “men” in the broad sense of "humanity", encompassing both male and female human beings. It is not typically used to specify or emphasize male as opposed to female sex: the usual terms to express “man” in the sense “male” are vir (adult male human being) or mās (male). There are rare examples in early Latin of homō being used in contrast to an explicitly female term such as mulier (woman), such as Plautus Cistellaria 723, but this only becomes frequent in late Latin.[2]
  • When referring to specific human beings, homō is more often applied to male rather than female persons in the corpus of ancient Latin texts. For Romans, the use of homō versus vir when referring to a male human being was influenced by the differing social connotations of the two words: vir tends to be reserved as a positive designation for men of the Roman upper class, whereas the more generic term homō is frequently used to refer to men of lower social orders or foreigners,[3] and also to refer to upper class men in contexts where the positive connotations of vir would be out of place. For example, homō rather than vir tends to be used by Cicero in connection with pejorative adjectives.[4] There seems to have been a similar distinction in social connotation between mulier (woman), the general word for 'woman' that could be used in neutral or negative contexts, and fēmina (female, woman), which had positive, aristocratic overtones when used as a designation for a woman.[5]
  • Homō is claimed to be of common (epicene) gender by several grammarians, albeit with limited external supporting evidence - see quotations. When used with a modifier and referring to a woman, nevertheless agrees in the masculine gender (like German Mensch, Russian челове́к (čelovék)) (Charisius, GL I, p.102.20–103.1 = pp.130.19–31.2 B.).

Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative homō hominēs
Genitive hominis hominum
Dative hominī hominibus
Accusative hominem hominēs
Ablative homine hominibus
Vocative homō hominēs

Hyponyms edit

  • mulier (adult human woman)
  • vir (adult human man) (with connotations of freeborn status and possession of masculine virtues)
  • fēmina (female; woman) (in Republican Latin, used especially to refer to women of social rank, functioning as a female counterpart of vir and a more respectful synonym of mulier)
  • mās (male), masculus
  • puella (girl)
  • puer (boy)
  • adulēscēns m or f (adolescent)
  • iuvenis m or f (youth)
  • senex m or f (aged person; old man; old woman)

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ Santoro L'Hoir, Francesca (1992) The Rhetoric of Gender Terms: 'man', 'woman', and the Portrayal of Character in Latin Prose, page 159
  2. ^ Adams, J. N. (1972), “Latin Words for 'Woman' and 'Wife'”, in Glotta, volume 50, issue 3./4., page 247
  3. ^ Santoro L'Hoir (1992), page 2
  4. ^ Santoro L'Hoir (1992), page 10
  5. ^ Santoro L'Hoir (1992), pages 32-33

Further reading edit

  • homo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • homo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • homo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[8], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • our contemporaries; men of our time: homines qui nunc sunt (opp. qui tunc fuerunt)
    • our contemporaries; men of our time: homines huius aetatis, nostrae memoriae
    • that is the way of the world; such is life: sic vita hominum est
    • the position of the lower classes: condicio ac fortuna hominum infimi generis
    • what am I to do with this fellow: quid huic homini (also hoc homine) faciam?
    • Fortune makes men shortsighted, infatuates them: fortuna caecos homines efficit, animos occaecat
    • my most intimate acquaintance: homo intimus, familiarissimus mihi
    • to be in every one's mouth: in ore omnium or omnibus (hominum or hominibus, but only mihi, tibi, etc.) esse
    • to be a subject for gossip: in sermonem hominum venire
    • the common opinion, the general idea: existimatio hominum, omnium
    • a devotee of pleasure; a self-indulgent man: homo voluptarius (Tusc. 2. 7. 18)
    • many men, many minds: quot homines, tot sententiae
    • within the memory of man: post hominum memoriam
    • within the memory of man: post homines natos
    • learned, scientific, literary men: homines litterarum studiosi
    • learned, scientific, literary men: homines docti
    • a man of learning; a scholar; a savant: vir or homo doctus, litteratus
    • for a Roman he is decidedly well educated: sunt in illo, ut in homine Romano, multae litterae (De Sen. 4. 12)
    • to civilise men, a nation: homines, gentem a fera agrestique vita ad humanum cultum civilemque deducere (De Or. 1. 8. 33)
    • an accomplished dialectician: homo in dialecticis versatissimus
    • moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • a conscientious historian: homo in historia diligens
    • a singer, member of a choir: (homo) symphoniacus
    • a wit; a joker: (homo) ridiculus (Plaut. Stich. 1. 3. 21)
    • a man of no self-control, self-indulgent: homo impotens sui
    • a man of no self-control, self-indulgent: homo effrenatus, intemperans
    • a moral (immoral) man: homo bene (male) moratus
    • a depraved, abandoned character: homo perditus
    • a man of character, with a strong personality: vir constans, gravis (opp. homo inconstans, levis)
    • to sacrifice human victims: pro victimis homines immolare
    • to unite isolated individuals into a society: dissipatos homines in (ad) societatem vitae convocare (Tusc. 1. 25. 62)
    • to shun society: hominum coetus, congressus fugere
    • business-men: homines negotii (always in sing.) gerentes
    • an experienced politician: homo in re publica exercitatus
    • a parvenu (a man no member of whose family has held curule office): homo novus
    • people of every rank: homines omnis generis
    • people of every rank and age: homines omnium ordinum et aetatum
    • one of the people: homo plebeius, de plebe
    • a popular man: aurae popularis homo (Liv. 42. 30)
    • public opinion: existimatio populi, hominum
    • to be always considering what people think: multum communi hominum opinioni tribuere
    • men of sound opinions: homines graves (opp. leves)
    • a democrat: homo popularis
    • a man who genuinely wishes the people's good: homo vere popularis (Catil. 4. 5. 9)
    • a democratic leader: homo florens in populari ratione
    • revolutionists: homines seditiosi, turbulenti or novarum rerum cupidi

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

Short for homofil (homophile) or homofil person (homophile person).

Adjective edit

homo (indeclinable)

  1. homosexual, gay

Noun edit

homo m (definite singular homoen, indefinite plural homoer, definite plural homoene)

  1. a homosexual or gay (male homosexual person).

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • “homo” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • homo” in The Ordnett Dictionary

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

Short for homofil (homophile) or homofil person (homophile person).

Adjective edit

homo (indeclinable)

  1. homosexual, gay

Noun edit

homo m (definite singular homoen, indefinite plural homoar, definite plural homoane)

  1. a homosexual or gay (male homosexual person).

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

References edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Hyphenation: ho‧mo

Adjective edit

homo (invariable)

  1. homosexual (involving or relating to homosexuals)
    Synonyms: homossexual, gay

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Clipping of homosexual.

Noun edit

homo m (plural homo)

  1. (slang) gay

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Adjective edit

homo (invariable)

  1. homo (homosexual)

Further reading edit

Swedish edit

Noun edit

homo c or n

  1. (colloquial, chiefly derogatory) a homo (homosexual)
    Synonym: bög

Adjective edit

homo

  1. (colloquial, only used predicatively) homosexual
    Synonym: homosexuell

See also edit

References edit

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

homo c (plural homo's)

  1. homosexual, gay person

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • homo”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011