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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French adroit.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

adroit (comparative adroiter or more adroit, superlative adroitest or most adroit)

  1. Deft, dexterous, or skillful.
    • 1851 October 18, Herman Melville, “Stubb’s Supper”, in The Whale, 1st British edition, London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 14262177; republished as Moby Dick or The White Whale (Famous Sea Stories), Boston, Mass.: The St. Botolph Society, 53 Beacon Street, 1892 (February 1922 printing), OCLC 237074, page 277, footnote:
      By adroit management the wooden float is made to rise on the other side of the mass, so that now having girdled the whale, the chain is readily made to follow suit; and being slipped along the body, is at last locked fast round the smallest part of the tail, at the point of junction with its broad flukes or lobes.

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

à + droit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

adroit (feminine singular adroite, masculine plural adroits, feminine plural adroites)

  1. skilful, apt, skilled (possessing skill, skilled)

DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit

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