See also: a part and à part

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English apart, aparte, a-part, a part, from Anglo-Norman a part, from Latin ad partem (to the side).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

apart (comparative more apart, superlative most apart)

  1. Placed separately (in regard to space or time).
    • 2015, Johnny Rogan, Ray Davies: A Complicated Life:
      We had a large bus and I had two of them at the front and two at the back, and I had to sit in the middle and keep them apart.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost:
      Others apart sat on a hill retired.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, [] (King James Version), London: [] Robert Barker, [], →OCLC, Psalms 4:3:
      But know that the Lord hath set apart him that is godly for himself.
  2. separately, exclusively, not together
    Consider the two propositions apart.
  3. In or into two or more parts.
    We took the computer apart and put it back together.
    • 1980, Joy Division (lyrics and music), “Love Will Tear Us Apart”:
      Love, love will tear us apart, again.

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

terms derived from apart (adverb)

Translations edit

Postposition edit

apart

  1. Aside; away; not included.
    Joking apart, what do you think?

Synonyms edit

Translations edit

Adjective edit

apart (not comparable)

  1. (after a noun or in the predicate) Exceptional, distinct.
    in a class apart.
  2. Having been taken apart; disassembled, in pieces.
  3. Separate, on the side.
    • 1838 (date written), L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], chapter XIV, in Lady Anne Granard; or, Keeping up Appearances. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], published 1842, →OCLC, page 172:
      The young lover was in waiting, to hand them out of the large substantial carriage, and the first quiet moment that he could find for an apart whisper, said, "What can be the reason that your mother has never taken the slightest notice of my letter?"

Noun edit

apart

  1. Misspelling of a part.
    • 2016, Jasmine Railey, Carter and Ayanna 2: A Hood Love[1] (Fiction), →ISBN, →OCLC, page 231:
      I killed a man. This was never apart[sic – meaning a part] of the plan, Tracy was supposed to do all of the dirty work.

References edit

apart”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch apart, from Middle French a part.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

apart (attributive aparte, comparative aparter, superlative apartste)

  1. separate

Derived terms edit

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle French a part.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

apart (comparative aparter, superlative apartst)

  1. separate
    Over het algemeen vindt men vier kleuren in een inkjetprinter. Zwart zit bijna altijd in een aparte cartridge, de andere kleuren kunnen ook in één cartridge zitten.
    In general one finds four colors in an inkjet printer. Black is almost always in a separate cartridge, the other colors can also be in a single cartridge.
  2. unusual
    Hij draagt zeer aparte hoeden.
    He wears very unusual hats.

Inflection edit

Inflection of apart
uninflected apart
inflected aparte
comparative aparter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial apart aparter het apartst
het apartste
indefinite m./f. sing. aparte apartere apartste
n. sing. apart aparter apartste
plural aparte apartere apartste
definite aparte apartere apartste
partitive aparts aparters

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Afrikaans: apart
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: apati
  • Negerhollands: apart
  • Papiamentu: apart
  • Sranan Tongo: apart, aparti

Anagrams edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French à part.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

apart (strong nominative masculine singular aparter, comparative aparter, superlative am apartesten)

  1. fancy, distinctive

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • apart” in Duden online
  • apart” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Latvian edit

Etymology edit

From ap- +‎ art (to plow).

Pronunciation edit

(file)

Verb edit

apart (transitive or intransitive, 1st conjugation, present aparu, apar, apar, past aparu)

  1. (perfective) to till (land, field) by plowing
    apart laukumu, tīrumuto plow, till the field
    apart platu joslu ap dārzuto plow, till a wide zone around the garden
  2. to overturn (an obstacle) while plowing; to overturn (an obstacle) and plow
    apart velēnas, rugājusto plow the turf, stubble (after turning it over)
    traktorists ar krūmu arklu apar alkšņus, sīkstus kārklusthe tractor driver plows through alder bushes and tough osiers with the bush plow
  3. to cover (e.g., planted potatoes) with earth by plowing around, by deepening the furrows; to furrow
    bija jāapar kartupeļi, tie zaļoja kā mežs; lai neiznāktu tikai laksti vien, vajadēja lakstus apmest nedaudz ar zemi - to izdarīja spīļu arklsit was time to plow around the potatoes, they had grown like a forest; so that not only leaves and stems would come out, it was necessary to throw some earth around them - the jaw plow does that
  4. (perfective) to plow around (to change direction around something while plowing; to plow the area around something)
    apart ap dārzuto plow around the garden
    art, apart akmenim apkārtto plow around the stone, rock

Conjugation edit

Synonyms edit

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French à part.

Adjective edit

apart (comparative apartare, superlative apartast)

  1. clearly deviating from the norm, peculiar, unique

Usage notes edit

Often but not always derogatory, like peculiar.

Declension edit

Inflection of apart
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular apart apartare apartast
Neuter singular apart apartare apartast
Plural aparta apartare apartast
Masculine plural3 aparte apartare apartast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 aparte apartare apartaste
All aparta apartare apartaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

References edit