See also: Rego, reĝo, and regó

English

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Etymology

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From registration +‎ -o (diminutive suffix).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rego (usually uncountable, plural regos)

  1. (uncountable, colloquial, Australia, New Zealand) Registration for a motor vehicle.
    The police pulled me over for driving with an expired rego.
    • 2003, Australian Senate, Parliamentary Debates (Hansard), page 18057:
      You might give these people a badge or some livery for their boat and you can give them a discount on the rego of their boat.
    • 2007, Archie Gerzee, WOW! Tales of a Larrikin Adventurer, page 223:
      They gave us permission to drive in Australia under the British rego, meaning we still had our GB number plates.
    • 2008, Ryan Ver Berkmoes, Peter Dragicevich, Justin Flynn, Paul Harding, East Coast Australia, page 501:
      When you come to buy or sell a car, every state has its own regulations, particularly with rego (registration).
  2. (uncountable, colloquial, Australia, New Zealand) The fee required for such registration.
    David couldn′t drive his car as he hadn′t paid his rego.
  3. (countable, colloquial, Australia, New Zealand) The registration number of a motor vehicle, used by police to access registration details such as the identity of the owner.
    • 1984, Renfrey Clarke, The Picket: Tasmanian Mine Workers Defend Their Jobs, page 84:
      “They also got the regos of the cars. There were two commercial travelers whose cars were trapped inside by the pickets, and they got hit with writs. []
    • 2010, Alex Palmer, The Labyrinth of Drowning, HarperCollins Australia, unnumbered page:
      A line of cars was parked along one side, presumably belonging to the sex workers and their clients. ‘Get their regos,’ Borghini said to one of his people.

Further reading

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  • rego”, in Oxford Learner's Dictionaries

Anagrams

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Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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rego

  1. first-person singular present indicative of regar

Galician

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furrows (gl:regos) and ridges (somas)

Etymology

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From the interaction of diverse sources: Latin rigāre (to water), a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia *reku ("river"), and Proto-Celtic *ɸrikā (furrow).[1] Compare Old Breton rec (furrow).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈreɣʊ], [ˈrɛɣʊ]

Noun

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rego m (plural regos)

  1. ditch (drainage trench)
    Synonym: birta
  2. furrow (a trench cut in the soil, as when plowed in order to plant a crop)
    Synonym: suco
  3. stream
    Synonym: regueiro

Derived terms

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Verb

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rego

  1. first-person singular present indicative of regar

References

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  1. ^ Joan Coromines, José A. Pascual (1983–1991) “regar”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos

Latin

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Etymology

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From Proto-Italic *regō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), extension of root *h₃reǵ- (to straighten). Cognate with Sanskrit राजति (rā́jati, to direct; to steer; to rule).[1]

Pronunciation

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Verb

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regō (present infinitive regere, perfect active rēxī, supine rēctum); third conjugation

  1. to rule, govern, direct
    Synonyms: dominor, imperō, gerō, imperitō, moderor, ōrdinō, magistrō, rēgnō
  2. to guide, steer
    • 8 CE, Ovid, Fasti 2.101:
      dubiam rege, nāvita, puppem
      Sailor, steer your veering vessel! (Imperative mood)
  3. to oversee, manage
    Synonyms: moderor, gerō, prōcūrō, dispēnsō
  4. to support
    Synonym: gero

Conjugation

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   Conjugation of regō (third conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present regō regis regit regimus regitis regunt
imperfect regēbam regēbās regēbat regēbāmus regēbātis regēbant
future regam regēs reget regēmus regētis regent
perfect rēxī rēxistī rēxit rēximus rēxistis rēxērunt,
rēxēre
pluperfect rēxeram rēxerās rēxerat rēxerāmus rēxerātis rēxerant
future perfect rēxerō rēxeris rēxerit rēxerimus rēxeritis rēxerint
passive present regor regeris,
regere
regitur regimur regiminī reguntur
imperfect regēbar regēbāris,
regēbāre
regēbātur regēbāmur regēbāminī regēbantur
future regar regēris,
regēre
regētur regēmur regēminī regentur
perfect rēctus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect rēctus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect rēctus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present regam regās regat regāmus regātis regant
imperfect regerem regerēs regeret regerēmus regerētis regerent
perfect rēxerim rēxerīs rēxerit rēxerīmus rēxerītis rēxerint
pluperfect rēxissem rēxissēs rēxisset rēxissēmus rēxissētis rēxissent
passive present regar regāris,
regāre
regātur regāmur regāminī regantur
imperfect regerer regerēris,
regerēre
regerētur regerēmur regerēminī regerentur
perfect rēctus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect rēctus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present rege regite
future regitō regitō regitōte reguntō
passive present regere regiminī
future regitor regitor reguntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives regere rēxisse rēctūrum esse regī rēctum esse rēctum īrī
participles regēns rēctūrus rēctus regendus,
regundus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
regendī regendō regendum regendō rēctum rēctū

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Catalan: regir
  • Friulian: rezi
  • Italian: reggere
  • Old Galician-Portuguese: reger
  • Piedmontese: rese
  • Romansch: reger, riger
  • Sicilian: rèjiri
  • Borrowings:

References

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  • rego”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • rego”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • rego in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • Carl Meißner, Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to have self-control; to restrain oneself, master one's inclinations: animum regere, coercere, cohibere
    • to keep house: rem domesticam, familiarem administrare, regere, curare
    • to govern, administer the state: rem publicam gerere, administrare, regere, tractare, gubernare
    • aristocracy (as a form of government): civitas, quae optimatium arbitrio regitur
    • (ambiguous) to belong to the king's bodyguard: a latere regis esse
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, pages 517-8

Portuguese

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Etymology 1

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Deverbal from regar. Compare Galician rego, Spanish riego. Cf. also Latin riguum.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rego m (plural regos)

  1. ditch (drainage trench)
  2. furrow (a trench cut in the soil, as when plowed in order to plant a crop)
  3. (vulgar) crack (space between the buttocks)

Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes: -ɛɡu
  • Hyphenation: re‧go

Verb

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rego

  1. first-person singular present indicative of regar