FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse akr, from Proto-Germanic *akraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

akur m (genitive singular akurs, plural akrar)

  1. (agriculture) field

DeclensionEdit

m20 Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative akur akurin akrar akrarnir
Accusative akur akurin akrar akrarnar
Dative akri akrinum økrum økrunum
Genitive akurs akursins akra akranna

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse akr, from Proto-Germanic *akraz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵros (field) whence also the Danish ager, Faroese akur, Swedish åker and Norwegian åker.

Germanic cognates include Old English æcer (English acre), Old Frisian ekker, Old Saxon akkar (Dutch akker), Old High German ackar (German Acker) and Gothic 𐌰𐌺𐍂𐍃 (akrs). Other cognates include Ancient Greek ἀγρός (agrós), Mycenaean Greek 𐀀𐀒𐀫 (a-ko-ro), Latin ager (Spanish agreste), Umbrian ager, Old Armenian արտ (art) and Sanskrit अज्र (ájra).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

akur m (genitive singular akurs, nominative plural akrar)

  1. (agriculture) field

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch akkoord, from Middle Dutch accoort, from Old French acorder (Modern French accord), from Vulgar Latin *accordō, accordāre (to be heart to heart with), formed from Latin ad + cor (heart). Doublet of accoord and akor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈakʊr]
  • Hyphenation: a‧kur

AdjectiveEdit

akur

  1. agreed
  2. match, suitable.

Alternative formsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


MatalEdit

NounEdit

akur

  1. stone
    Kiya uwaga seteni azà vok à slaka aŋha la magoɗal: "Baŋa kak Kona aŋa Zəzagəla ndzer kà, 'Pàk kaf!', gòɗ à akur uwanay." (Mata 4:3)[1]
    And the tempter approached and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, order that this stone become bread.” (Matthew 4:3)

ReferencesEdit